Ryan Gander: STORE

By Withers, Rachel | Artforum International, February 2004 | Go to article overview

Ryan Gander: STORE


Withers, Rachel, Artforum International


Ryan Gander seems to be something of a tease. His installation But it was all green, 2003, camouflaged STORE's exterior windows by covering them with the type of reflective, translucent black plastic sheeting that usually connotes "sex shop." The near-empty interior, however, would instantly have dashed the hopes of any visitor seeking reading matter of the one-handed variety. The floor was covered with plain black carpet, four speakers were placed in the gallery's ceiling corners, and an antiquated but functioning flip-dot signboard was inset in the wall, an apparently random scattering of yellow dots slowly trickling down its surface. The work (which contained no green element whatsoever, at least optically speaking) exemplified what the 2003 Prix de Rome catalogue characterizes as Gander's "minimal, barely expressive visual language."

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

The work's aural content amply made up for this sparseness. Above the discreet rustle of the signboard, the speakers relayed the cultivated voice of British art historian Margaret Garlake, delivering a script (by Gander) in the form of an illustrated lecture on color--or rather, on invisibility. It described seven instances (some possibly fictitious or at least exaggerated) of colors devised or evolved to facilitate disappearance. (It also included some writerly slips--like the misuse of the words "misnomer" and "allegedly"--that slightly undermined the project's authority. Gander needs to find himself an editor.) Examples included "the world's blackest black," an exceptionally light-absorbent chemical coating invented to improve the Hubble Space Telescope's imaging capacity; the specific blue used for Chroma-Key video effects; the black leopard's deceptive "spots" (the consequence of differences in fur length rather than color); and Black Watch military tartan. Originally made from a mix of exclusively black fibers, this textile only revealed its tartan weave when caught by the light (or so Gander claims). …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Ryan Gander: STORE
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.