Pre-Flight Screening

By Wade, Jared | Risk Management, February 2004 | Go to article overview

Pre-Flight Screening


Wade, Jared, Risk Management


In the wake of the September 11 attacks, many Americans accepted new security procedures, especially at airports and other transportation facilities, as a regrettable but acceptable price to pay tot the sake of safety. A new pre-flight screening process called CAPPS II (Computer Assisted Passenger Prescreening Program), however, threatens to go well beyond current screening procedures, using citizens' personal information to assign a hazard code to them. The controversial plan has civil liberties groups on the warpath and defense contractors left to ponder how much security can a free society sustain and still be worthy of the name.

In a speech last November, Al Gore noted that if the September 11 hijackers' backgrounds had been checked when they purchased their airline tickets, they might have been discovered before they carried out their plot. Gore said that many of the hijackers were already on CIA and FBI terrorist watchlists, and had intelligence analysts been able to cross-check the various names, phone numbers, expired visas and frequent flier numbers they used to buy their airline tickets, the hijackings probably could have been thwarted before any of the doomed planes left the ground.

Gore's comments highlighted a pressing need for Washington and the airline industry to re-evaluate its approach to pre-flight security. The Transportation Security Administration's (TSA) answer to the problem is the controversial CAPPS II, which is still being reviewed for implementation in U.S. airports. The program was designed to determine the likelihood of any passenger posing a threat to the security of the flight and has already gone through preliminary testing with Delta airlines in three undisclosed airports.

If implemented, CAPPS II would require passengers to provide their full name, home address, telephone number, date of birth and basic itinerary information when reserving a flight. Then the program would cross-reference this with criminal records, credit and financial information, public records such as tax returns and voting history, and other intelligence (including attendance at political meetings or public demonstrations). Using this information, CAPPS II would compile a database that will provide an electronic risk assessment for every potential flier.

This assessment would assign passengers to one of three color-coded risk profiles. Green means the passenger must face normal airport security, yellow makes the passenger subject to higher scrutiny and red means the passenger is likely to pose a threat--and may be prohibited from boarding the plane altogether. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Pre-Flight Screening
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.