Salil Tripathi Remembers Nissim Ezekiel, the Gentle Indian Poet Whose Pioneering Work in English Inspired Later Generations of Writers

By Tripathi, Salil | New Statesman (1996), February 9, 2004 | Go to article overview

Salil Tripathi Remembers Nissim Ezekiel, the Gentle Indian Poet Whose Pioneering Work in English Inspired Later Generations of Writers


Tripathi, Salil, New Statesman (1996)


To fully appreciate the achievements of Nissim Ezekiel, the Indian poet who died last month aged 80 in Bombay, we should not remember the honours and awards he received in the 1980s, but the lonely environment in which he started writing in the early 1950s.

The mood in India at that time was largely anti-colonial; some politicians even wanted to abolish English, the language in which Ezekiel wrote. A Jew in cosmopolitan Bombay, in an India prone to sectarian violence, Ezekiel could not have been more of an outsider. He was the Reader in American Literature at the university, ran a theatre group, wrote advertising copy and art criticism, and also edited the PEN journal. But he also found the time to write and to meet aspiring poets. Dom Moraes, who met him when he was still a schoolboy in the early 1950s, recalls: "He gave young poets the feeling that they were not alone."

Generations of poets, like Moraes, and later Ranjit Hoskote, Jerry Pinto, Menka Shivdasani, Raj Rao, and Jeet Thayil, found Ezekiel to be extremely approachable, happy to read and comment on their work. Moraes remembers him as thin and pale, "with spectacles and long, delicate hands. He had a warm nature that he tried hard to suppress." Pinto recalls showing him his poetry, and Ezekiel pointing out that Pinto had used commas in lines 2, 3, and 7, but not after 1, 5, and 8. Why, he asked.

"I hadn't thought about it", Pinto replied.

"Think about them, then," he said.

Ezekiel was a reflective man who did not rush into making an opinion. This unwillingness to offend may have come from his acute sense that in India everyone had to get along. When India banned Salman Rushdie's The Satanic Verses, Ezekiel was running the PEN All-India Centre and everyone expected him to stand up for free expression, but he did not. He argued that an intellectual should not upset the community in which he works. A quiet man, not prone to extremes, Ezekiel preferred to bow and bend. He would not bend to the state, but rather to those who claimed to speak for the aggrieved.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

But in 1964 he took a strong line on V S Naipaul's An Area of Darkness, a sweeping indictment of India which was full of generalisations that were at times infuriating and at others uncannily accurate. …

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