Hypertension and Lipid Societies Mark 10 Years

Manila Bulletin, February 8, 2004 | Go to article overview

Hypertension and Lipid Societies Mark 10 Years


The WHO has predicted that by 2020, 15 percent of the total deaths in developing countries will be due to cardiovascular disease. By sheer numbers, the scourge of heart disease will alter the health landscape.

High blood pressure or hypertension is the most prevalent form of heart disease currently affecting 21 percent of the Philippine population. Lipid disorders (cholesterol and triglyceride abnormalities) are also prevalent at four percent.

By forecasting the need to control these diseases locally, eminent cardiologists formed respective societies 10 years ago. The Philippine Society of Hypertension (PSH) was established in 1993 by Dr. Ramon Abarquez while the Philippine Lipid Society (PLS) was set up by Dr. Tommy Ty-Willing and Dr. Rody Sy in the same year.

The PSH envisions the reduction and treatment of hypertension through health education, research and strategic partnerships. The PLS likewise aims to promote the understanding, treatment and prevention of lipid disorders.

Relevant researches

Since that time, both societies have linked up with each other and have produced relevant and groundbreaking researches and conventions on hypertension and lipids.

In 1998, the PSH and PLS supported and participated in the FNRI nutrition survey to piggyback a prevalence survey on hypertension and lipid disorders in the Philippines. The results show that 21 percent of Filipinos are hypertensive and that the prevalence in the elderly population is nearly half. This means that every one out of two elderly Filipinos are hypertensive and one out of five adult Filipinos are hypertensive. This makes hypertension a serious public health threat.

For lipid disorders, the prevalence was noted at four percent in the study. In contrast to American data, the PLS found that Filipinos have higher HDLs and lower LDLs. If the Filipino genetic disposition is found to be different from our Caucasian counterparts, then this may have treatment implications later on.

Free lectures for laypersons and doctor-trainees

On its 10th year of existence, the PSH and PLS have held eight annual conventions highlighting the latest updates in hypertension and lipid disorders. These medical conventions are unique in the sense that a wide spectrum of laypersons are invited to lecture and participate in the program.

This years annual convention, entitled "Linking up for holistic cardiovascular control," will be held from Feb. 5 to 7, at the EDSA Shangri-La Hotel in Mandaluyong City.

Doctors-in-training, interns and residents are in for a real treat because they will be allowed to attend the whole three-day convention for free. They only have to register in advance. …

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