Chronicling a Technology Initiative

By Shaw, Trevor | Multimedia & Internet@Schools, January-February 2004 | Go to article overview

Chronicling a Technology Initiative


Shaw, Trevor, Multimedia & Internet@Schools


FOR the past year and a half, I have written the MMS column "Making IT Work for Learning." In this column, I examined some of the institutional and pedagogical forces that shape instructional technology. Beginning with this issue of the new MMIS, my column has changed both in name and in content.

"Learning Unleashed!" will chronicle a technology capital initiative of the same name that we will undertake at the Dwight-Englewood School. It is the product of nearly 2-and-a-half years of discussion and planning among a variety of stakeholders who have examined various aspects of our technology program and sought ways to make it more flexible and effective.

The Technology Imperative

For many years, our school has been effective in the integration of technology into the curriculum. Our integrated Math Science Technology (MST) program forces students to use technology in their exploration of authentic problems in their math and science courses. In grades nine through eleven, all students use Visual Basic, ArcView GIS, Flash, and other technical tools to model and experiment with advanced concepts in math and science.

Over the past 10 years, this innovative program has created an enormous demand for technical resources that the school has done its best to meet. Recently, however, we have found that the traditional model of deploying computers in computer labs is no longer capable of meeting our needs. While each classroom also has a singe computer, a single computer is inadequate for the types of activities that our curriculum demands. Beyond our MST curriculum, other teachers have begun to use more digital resources in presentations, and the current system of signing up in advance for an LCD projector and hooking it up before class simply doesn't lend itself to very flexible instruction.

Limited availability and the limited flexibility of our current technology have become the bottleneck in our efforts to continue integrating technology into the curriculum, and the goal of our Learning Unleashed initiative is to address these limitations. In addition to being a huge scheduling challenge, technology classes usurp a huge amount of our computer lab space. Because technology is a mandatory, year-long course for all 9th, 10th, and 11th graders, and because it must be taught in a computer lab, there are a number of periods during the week when there is simply no computer lab to which other teachers can bring their classes.

The Usability and Availability Imperatives

The philosophy behind Learning Unleashed is that technology should be available, useable, reliable, and flexible. Students don't learn as well when the tech tools they need are only available to them for 45 minutes twice a week in the computer lab. Teachers won't choose to use technologies that they have to spend 3 days of prep time learning. They certainly won't continue to use technology that fails at critical moments and that they can't rely on. A school needs technology that is flexible enough to function in any room at any time at a moment's notice. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Chronicling a Technology Initiative
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.