Defending the Audience's Passion; Any Anti-Semitism Is the Beholder's

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), March 1, 2004 | Go to article overview

Defending the Audience's Passion; Any Anti-Semitism Is the Beholder's


Byline: Suzanne Fields, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

The harshest criticism in the wake of "The Passion of the Christ," Mel Gibson's movie about the last 12 hours of the life of Jesus, is directed not at the movie or even at Mel Gibson, but at the audience of evangelicals and the devout who have embraced the movie as a phenomenon of their faith. Any anti-Semitism present is not inside the movie, it seems clear to me, but in the eye of the beholder who will be inflamed against the Jews.

The audiences for the movie are not likely to be so angered by the depiction of the Sanhedrin, the corrupt Jewish court in the Jerusalem of 20 centuries ago, that they will leave the theaters in search of a Jew to stone, a synagogue to desecrate, or a kosher deli to target with a pork chop through the window. Nobody expected audiences for "The Godfather" or "The Sopranos" to rage against Italians for the crimes of Mafia gangsters, nor would anyone expect a movie about the Inquisition to inspire violence against St. Patrick's Cathedral.

This is an old story. Plato wanted to exclude creative writers from his ideal society because he understood that they had the power to unleash base instincts. Mr. Gibson's interpretation of the Passion, scorned by its critics, might even send moviegoers to the Gospel of John (Chapters 18 through 22) to see what, exactly, the disciples (Jews all) said about the last hours of Christ's life. The book, as usual, is worth a thousand (moving) pictures.

If Mr. Gibson were Muslim, a fatwa could be ordered on his life for what some would no doubt regard as blasphemy, but the First Amendment guarantees everyone the right to say what he pleases, short of shouting fire in a crowded theater. This movie isn't close to that. What's actually at issue here is the aesthetic, that the director depicts uncomplicated brutality without inspiring pity and fear. The film lacks a catharsis of provocative poetry that drives great inspirational art. The repeated brutality might be harmful to the psychic health of any spectator, whether Christian, Jew, Hindu, Buddhist, Muslim or even whatever. One moviegoer suffered a fatal heart attack, but that's not necessarily Mr. Gibson's fault.

The director tells us, ad nauseum, that he is not anti-Semitic and few doubt that. Not even Abraham Foxman, national director of the Anti-Defamation League, thinks he is. He calls him "insensitive." Mr. Foxman is entitled to his opinion, which is an opinion formed from years of examining and exposing actual slurs against Jews, but risks sounding a little insensitive himself. …

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