Marriage Protection Law Should Require Men to Pick Up Socks

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), February 28, 2004 | Go to article overview

Marriage Protection Law Should Require Men to Pick Up Socks


Byline: Burt Constable

While I whole-heartedly support gay marriages, I understand how people find the sex part repulsive. Heck, I recoil whenever heterosexuals Bob Dole and Mike Ditka come on TV to talk about their libidos.

Strip away the legal issues, and the only difference between a loving, caring heterosexual marriage and a loving, caring homosexual union is the sex acts (if they exist). I think the institution of marriage can't be characterized solely by sex acts. But if others want to use carnal activities to define marriage, well, it's a free country.

However, what I don't understand is how my heterosexual marriage sanctioned by the Roman Catholic Church and recognized nationwide by our government is threatened by the union of Rosie O'Donnell and her lesbian partner.

From Bill Clinton and his "Marriage Protection Act" to George W. Bush's insistence that "Our nation must enact a constitutional amendment to protect marriage in America," our leaders contend that marriage is under attack by gays.

I don't get that. How does a gay marriage, or even another heterosexual marriage, affect my marriage?

Marriage is not like real estate. If someone moves onto your block, trashes their property, litters their front yard with beer cans, sells crack out of the kitchen window and never uses a lawn- edger, that could reduce the property values for everyone on the block.

But my marriage stands on its own merits, regardless of whatever sick and perverted things that couple across the street do to each other. My wife and I promised God that our union would endure for life. If we vowed that we'd "let no man put asunder" our union, we surely can't let the union of two men tear us asunder.

If gay marriage becomes the law of the land, do we really expect heterosexual marriage to collapse? Will "lesbians moved in next door" supplant "irreconcilable differences" as a reason for seeking divorce?

If government really wanted to protect old-fashioned heterosexual unions, we'd amend the constitution to require husbands to pick up socks.

I'd be willing to bet that the damage wreaked on marriage by gay weddings will pale compared to the marital wounds inflicted by ESPN's 24-hour sports coverage and the advent of Internet porn. …

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