Perfect Gift for Black History Month: For Africans at Home and the Diaspora Who Want Their Children to Know about Their Rich Heritage, Nothing Could Be More Helpful Than a New 34-Page Book, Black Scientists and Inventors Book II, Recently Published by BIS Publications, Based in London. Tom Mbakwe Reports

By Mbakwe, Tom | New African, February 2004 | Go to article overview

Perfect Gift for Black History Month: For Africans at Home and the Diaspora Who Want Their Children to Know about Their Rich Heritage, Nothing Could Be More Helpful Than a New 34-Page Book, Black Scientists and Inventors Book II, Recently Published by BIS Publications, Based in London. Tom Mbakwe Reports


Mbakwe, Tom, New African


Written by Michael Williams and Ava Henry, the A4-size book is designed to be used by children between the ages of 7 and 16. It is written in simple language and covers some black scientists and inventors (not all), including Lewis Latimer (born in Chelsea, USA) who, in 1881, invented an electric incandescent light bulb using a carbon filament. His invention was a vast improvement on Thomas Edison's light bulb of 1874 which could not stay alight for long.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

There is also a piece on Philip Emeagwali, the Nigerian (born in 1954 but domiciled in the USA since 1974) who became the first person in 1989 to programme a supercomputer to perform 3.1 billion calculations per second. Emeagwali has since had 41 discoveries and inventions to his name.

There is also George Washington Carver (1860-1943) who was born in Missouri, USA, as a slave but who, in later life, invented 300 products from peanuts, soy beans and sweet potatoes, such as milk, face cream, soap, ink, paints and rubber.

The book, according to the publishers (BIS Publications), is meant to be a teaching aid and a rebuttal to the oft-repeated claim that "black people can't invent". …

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Perfect Gift for Black History Month: For Africans at Home and the Diaspora Who Want Their Children to Know about Their Rich Heritage, Nothing Could Be More Helpful Than a New 34-Page Book, Black Scientists and Inventors Book II, Recently Published by BIS Publications, Based in London. Tom Mbakwe Reports
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