Reader's Guide to British History

By Pearce, Robert | History Review, March 2004 | Go to article overview

Reader's Guide to British History


Pearce, Robert, History Review


David Loades (ed) Fitzroy Dearborn, 2003 2 vols, 1760 pp, 200 [pounds sterling] ISBN 1-57958-242-7

In 1973 the economist E.F. Schumacher proclaimed 'Small is Beautiful'. Hard-pressed students tend to agree, and certainly textbooks are becoming smaller and smaller. But surely we all want reference books to be as voluminous as possible. Which student of history hasn't benefited from The History Today Companion to British History (at 840 pages) or The Oxford Companion to British History (at 1050)? But now even these weighty tomes are dwarfed by the new two-volume set from Fitzroy Dearborn, which contains twice as many pages--and substantially bigger pages--as the History Today Companion. The indexes alone total 177 pages, and there are 25 pages listing around 370 contributors.

The Reader's Guide, like its smaller compatriots, is arranged in the easy-to-use A-Z format, but there is one essential difference with this new work. Instead of being a guide to history, it is a guide to historiography--to 'the most informative secondary scholarship' on important issues in British history, around a thousand of them. It looks at the themes, the changes and the controversies which historians have highlighted in their books and scholarly articles. As a result, this two-volume set provides a distinctive and valuable approach. There is of course a danger, if students use the books unwisely. All too often history students write essays in terms of the opinions of historians, with the actual past sometimes being marginalised or even ignored altogether. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Reader's Guide to British History
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.