Tuscan Entry

By Whiteley, Peter O. | Sunset, March 2004 | Go to article overview

Tuscan Entry


Whiteley, Peter O., Sunset


Here's a great example of creating a better first impression. The new entryway practically beckons guests to the door. Before, an expansive asphalt driveway butted directly against the stark white walls of this unadorned Mediterranean-style home, and there wasn't any attractive landscaping to soften the appearance and draw the eye.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Landscaper and contractor Mike Thomas created a gracious sense of arrival by adding layers of plants and hardscape at various heights along the approach, defining a clear path to the front door. He reduced the amount of asphalt with curved planting beds close to the house. These beds direct guests to the entry path, which is framed by a pair of tall terra-cotta planters. A trellised gateway rises from low garden walls and is partly covered by wisteria and clematis.

Drought-tolerant trees, vines, and naturalized and native plants, as well as architectural details--including a high trellis near the roof line of the formerly blank wall--add texture and definition to the entrance. Beyond the gateway trellis, a new stone path leads to an expanded entry stairway. …

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