Memos Might Reveal Profit Motive in Senate

Insight on the News, March 15, 2004 | Go to article overview

Memos Might Reveal Profit Motive in Senate


Byline: Paul M. Weyrich, SPECIAL TO INSIGHT

A hot topic of recent political news is the so-called "Memogate." If you have followed such things then you know that some memos from the files of Democrats on the Senate Judiciary Committee made their way into the hands of the media. Thereafter, committee chairman Sen. Orrin Hatch (R-Utah) expressed outrage that such a thing would happen on his watch. And somewhat later, Manny Miranda, who worked for Hatch and more recently has handled judicial nominations for Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist (R-Tenn.), resigned. But not before he wrote a tough letter to the Senate Ethics Committee suggesting that the memos which have not yet been seen indicate possibly unlawful activities on the part of senators.

A number of conservative groups also have asked that the Justice Department investigate the matter. And Miranda, in an interview with CNS News, has charged that the "profit motive" is driving the Senate Judiciary Committee battles where key Bush administration appointments have been filibustered by liberal Democrats.

"What would be truly shocking to the American people is the profit motive that is involved," Miranda said. "It isn't just about abortion 'rights,' the battle is about abortion profits. The axis of profits that undergirds the fight in the Judiciary Committee is the axis between trial lawyers who want particular types of judges who rule in particular ways on their cases and not the abortion-rights lobby but the abortion-clinics lobby. The abortion-rights lobby is just a front for something worse, which is the abortion-clinics lobby, represented by the National Abortion Federation."

Miranda told CNS News that on average abortion clinics make $1,000 for every abortion they perform. "That's where the money is. That's what is really happening here," Miranda said. He went on to say that "the abortion-clinics lobby is an industry as large as any industry that lobbies in Washington and, when combined with the single-mindedness of trial lawyers in trying to obtain a particular kind of judge, the enormity of the money that is behind the Democratic push is astounding and shocking. When you combine it then with the interests of the labor movement, then you start seeing that the effort to control the judiciary is really an enormous and well-orchestrated profit-making business."

Okay. Miranda also has said that among the memos not yet made public is an indication of potential criminal activity. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Memos Might Reveal Profit Motive in Senate
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.