End the FDA's Monopoly

By Henderson, David R. | Reason, April 2004 | Go to article overview

End the FDA's Monopoly


Henderson, David R., Reason


The Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's) recent bah on dietary supplements containing ephedra shows just how dysfunctional government regulation of drugs and dietary supplements is. Ephedra, according to the FDA, is a naturally occurring substance derived from a Chinese herb. Ephedrine, the main active ingredient of ephedra, has been used for centuries to treat respiratory symptoms and is also used to aid weight loss, enhance sports performance, and increase energy.

Why the ban? The FDA claims that dietary supplements containing ephedra pose "an unreasonable risk" for the consumer. The FDA states in its press release that it reviewed "a seminal report by the RAND Corporation." But in the fine print, you read that, of 16,000 adverse events RAND studied, there were two deaths, four heart attacks, nine strokes, one seizure, and tire psychiatric cases. RAND said these events "may indicate a safety problem but do not prove that ephedra caused the adverse event" (emphasis added). Even Naderite Sidney Wolfe, a self-proclaimed consumer advocate, claims only 155 ephedra-related deaths over a decade.

Interestingly, many users of such dietary supplements rushed to stock up on their supplies before the bah begins. They judged, apparently, that the benefits were worth the risks. To the FDA, though, their judgment does not count. And therein lies the problem.

The same problem arises with the FDA's requirement that drug companies test for safety and efficacy before being allowed to sell a drug. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

End the FDA's Monopoly
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.