LOOK!: HEALTH: Uncork Talk on Drinking; Why You Should Talk to Your Children about Alcohol

Liverpool Echo (Liverpool, England), March 24, 2004 | Go to article overview

LOOK!: HEALTH: Uncork Talk on Drinking; Why You Should Talk to Your Children about Alcohol


Byline: Jane Woodhead

IT'Sa tricky subject and one which many parents dread bringing up with their children. Just how do you tackle the thorny subject of booze with your kids -or even stop them drinking if they've already started?

The dangers of alcohol are taught in school but long before this subject is even raised,many youngsters have already tried a tipple.

It could be that they get involved with a ``bad crowd'',or simply hanging around on a street corner at night and having a drink seems ``the thing to do to pass the night away''.

Experts believe children are now forming attitudes about drinking from the age of five and by the age of seven most children have already tasted alcohol. Between the ages of 10 and 13 it is believed that most children will have had their first alcoholic drink,as opposed to just a taste.

And it is by the age of 16 that youngsters start to drink more heavily.

Liverpool's Alder Hey hospital treats around 70 children every three months for drink related illnesses.

Lynn Owens,nurse consultant in alcohol services at the Royal Liverpool University hospital, says:``Many parents wonder when they should talk to their children about alcohol,if at all. Children will often ask about alcohol and drinking when they are very young and when this happens a positive response is far better than simply just avoiding the issue.

``Most parents do not see the need to raise the subject until their children reach their teens, when they apparently start to drink alcohol but you should talk to your children far earlier than this, before they have the opportunity to experiment.''

Mrs Owens treated a patient who started drinking at the age of 14.

The girl, who does not want to be identified, is from a middle class family and ``just got into the habit'' of drinking wine.

Mrs Owens adds: ``I do not think her parents had spoken to her and by the age of 16 she was drinking a bottle of wine every night. A year later she had cirrhosis of the liver.''

This is scarring of the liver which can eventually lead to the liver collapsing.

Today,at the age of 19, she is studying at college and does not touch alcohol.

Mrs Owens says: ``She just does not know why she did it and this case just proves that it is never too early to talk to children.

``Children of today see alcohol and at functions which they attend with family they are likely to be coming into contact with alcohol on a regular basis.''

Chris Parry,from Prenton in Wirral,has a four-year-old son, Luke,and a 16 year olddaughter, Harriet. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

LOOK!: HEALTH: Uncork Talk on Drinking; Why You Should Talk to Your Children about Alcohol
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.