No Gripes with Grape

Evening Chronicle (Newcastle, England), March 26, 2004 | Go to article overview

No Gripes with Grape


Grape Vine Bar and Bistro

7 Marlborough Crescent

(0191) 2611 466.

I'm still reeling from the shock. How did we manage to feed a party of five and still have change from pounds 20?

I keep looking at the bill and I still don't believe it.

It was one evening last month when we stumbled (literally) upon this little treasure of a place. We'd got tickets to see the circus which had put up a tent on the car park at the Arena and were desperately looking for somewhere to eat before we hit the Big Top.

We'd parked at the Centre for Life and had less than 45 minutes to find somewhere to get fed and watered - and we needed somewhere that was child-friendly.

We were walking up by the Centre for Life, in the gay village, when my dad spotted a possibility.

The weather that night was foul and so we let him risk life and limb running over the road to check the place out. He disappeared inside and for a couple of minutes we just looked at each other while we waited for him to return.

Two minutes later and he was again outside beckoning us to come in.

I was a little worried. From outside you really couldn't tell what this place was going to be like - was it a bar, was it a bistro? Well, after making our way in, I can tell you it's both.

The restaurant is homely and fairly basic, but if you want good food at unbelievably cheap prices, then this is the place for you. When I'm hungry I can easily dispense with the low lighting and ambient music. But if that's what shakes your booty, choose somewhere else to dine.

While it's not nouvelle cuisine, there was plenty on the menu and special boards to satisfy most taste buds.

There's a great choice for breakfast, including what's dubbed the fatty breakfast, otherwise known as a British fry-up for pounds 4. …

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