Coming on the L Word

By Clinton, Kate | The Advocate (The national gay & lesbian newsmagazine), March 30, 2004 | Go to article overview

Coming on the L Word


Clinton, Kate, The Advocate (The national gay & lesbian newsmagazine)


On Super Bowl Sunday, hereafter known as National Wardrobe Malfunction Day, we had the gals over to watch the game. Despite the halftime bodice-ripping and the odd completed pass, the first real tension at the party arose when one of our guests pointed out that The L Word was on in five minutes.

The game had four minutes left to play--which, with time-outs, could actually run 20. Meanwhile, in an end run, our guest had commandeered the clicker. At 10 P.M., in mid Patriot cheer, suddenly we were zooming over Los Angeles in The L Word's opening credits. Instant roar: "What happened?"

The clickermeister smiled.

Then back to the game. Then to the Planet, the West Holly wood coffee shop where The L Word's chic lesbian friends hang out. Back to the Super Bowl-winning kick. Then back to The L Word for good, and museum director Bette eye-fucking a piece of art.

Despite some decompression stops, surfacing too quickly from the NFL's testosterone-and-Viagra netherworld to the L world of estrogen and pheromones is downright disorienting. I still have a headache, but it's totally worth it.

I don't know about you, but now I go through my day fantasizing, This would be a great episode for The L Word. And I am convinced that the adventures of Shane, the kindhearted sexual roue, are based on my early life. The sound you hear is my girlfriend snorting.

Sure, there has been some grousing: "The sex is not that hot." Implying, "not as hot as the sex we are having at my place." Yeah, right. Or "It does not represent real lesbian life."

Repeat after me: television. You might not see yourself yet, but given that the show is getting more of a chance to develop than Ellen ever got, I have confidence that they'll get round to even third-tier lesbian archetypes. Meanwhile, here are some episodes we'd like to see:

L Hath No Fury

An "ex-lesbian" rogue Christian fundamentalist and hairdresser named Anne Paulk starts hanging out at the Planet leaving pamphlets, talking Bible trash, and trying to repair Shane's sexuality and her Keith Richards hairstyle. …

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