Same-Sex "Marriage" and the Homosexual Agenda

By Bentley, Chrisopher S. | The New American, March 22, 2004 | Go to article overview

Same-Sex "Marriage" and the Homosexual Agenda


Bentley, Chrisopher S., The New American


ITEM: New York Times columnist Frank Rich provided the establishment-approved "denouement of the epic drama over gay marriage" in his February 29 celebration of the unnatural union entitled "The Joy of Gay Marriage." "[I]t's going to happen within a generation," he said. "[I]t has already happened in San Francisco.... Whatever their short-term legal fate, the San Francisco weddings mark a new high-water mark in one of the most fast-paced cultural tsunamis America has seen." Rich also noted that "by the time the conventions roll around this summer, gay marriages are likely to be a civic fact in Boston," where the Democratic Convention will be held.

AHEAD OF THE CURVE: Anyone who has not just emerged from a cultural cocoon knows that homosexuality, a perversion once confined to the shadows, has gone "mainstream." Homosexual characters--almost always portrayed as the most gifted and noble among us--abound in television and the movies. Last year's breakout "reality" television show, Queer Eye for the Straight Guy, depicted homosexual males as unapproachably hip, faultlessly tasteful people willing to help less refined heterosexuals overcome their shortcomings. Schoolchildren are indoctrinated into the belief that homosexuality is normal and healthy--and that opposition to it is a symptom of a supposed sickness called "homophobia." Homosexual "couples" are becoming increasingly common at high school dances across the nation, and in some communities teenage girls have discovered it is chic to "experiment" with lesbianism.

Two years ago, the New York Times began publishing "wedding" announcements for homosexual couples. And now--in New York, California, New Mexico and Oregon--homosexual activists and their political allies are conducting what they ate pleased to call "same-sex marriages." These "marriages," they insist, must be accorded the same status in law as actual marriages between a man and a woman. The homosexual revolution has progressed so quickly that it was not widely recognized by moral Americans as a serious threat until very recently. It certainly was not viewed as a force that could make a mockery, in law, of the sacred institution of marriage. This subversive onslaught was no surprise to THE NEW AMERICAN, which has warned against the threat for many years in the hope of preventing what is now transpiring.

As early as the January 19, 1987 issue, we stated that the "homosexual movement" was "actively" pushing "its agenda through a wide range of activities," including its effort to redefine the "family to include homosexual couples." Then, in the September 24, 1990 issue, we went on record that the homosexual lobby was seeking not only to "abolish the stigma," but to "force 'straight" society to accept them," so as to "flaunt their perversion openly. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Same-Sex "Marriage" and the Homosexual Agenda
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.