Pennsylvania Ballet

By Gottschild, Brenda Dixon | Dance Magazine, April 2004 | Go to article overview

Pennsylvania Ballet


Gottschild, Brenda Dixon, Dance Magazine


PENNSYLVANIA BALLET ACADEMY OF MUSIC PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA OCTOBER 30-NOVEMBER 8, 2003

I left the Pennsylvania Ballet's performance of Dracula thinking, "What an amazing company this is!" After changes in artistic leadership, bankruptcy, and near extinction in the 1990s, it has emerged victoriously alive and kicking in the new millennium, with Roy Kaiser at the helm. This is the company's fortieth anniversary season, and they are by no means middle aged. The PA Ballet repertoire ranges across the ballet spectrum from nineteenth-century classics to contemporary pieces by Dwight Rhoden, David Parsons, and Trey McIntyre. The dancers' command of Balanchine's works should bring enthusiasts flocking to Philadelphia to see them strut their stuff during the centennial year.

So, why Dracula? Well, it was the Halloween season and, like The Nutcracker for Christmas, holiday programming is a surefire crowd pleaser. I attended a Saturday matinee performance. Kids (mainly girls) of all ethnicities brought their parents, attesting to the success of Kaiser's outreach, education, and marketing efforts. Ghoulish regalia was on sale in the lobby, and some youngsters came dressed in capes and long, web-sleeved dresses. The audience was in the mood, and they were given a spectacle that lived up to expectations. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Pennsylvania Ballet
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.