VERB Project Takes Action for Young Physical Fitness; Approach Adapts Exercise for Children, Youths According to Their Likes to Keep Them Active

By Garza, Cynthia L. | The Florida Times Union, March 29, 2004 | Go to article overview

VERB Project Takes Action for Young Physical Fitness; Approach Adapts Exercise for Children, Youths According to Their Likes to Keep Them Active


Garza, Cynthia L., The Florida Times Union


Byline: CYNTHIA L. GARZA, The Times-Union

Seven-year-old A.J. Jones wants to be a dancer, he says with an unflinching and serious look.

That was after he had danced the Cha Cha Slide for a half hour with about two dozen other Thunderbolt Elementary School students in Clay County.

To adults, the kids were doing more than just a "slide to the left, slide to the right, criss-cross, criss-cross and then a cha cha real smooth."

They were being active.

"Don't call it fitness," said Natalie Showalter, Clay County YMCA site director and fitness coordinator. "Just make it fun."

It's exercise, but "sometimes it's better to just keep it a secret," Showalter said.

Slide. Criss-cross. Cha cha. They're all verbs -- action words that are taking on a new meaning for children across the country through a new campaign called VERB. The program encourages those from 9 to 13 -- a group dubbed "tweens" -- to get active.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention effort is designed to entice the age group away from video game playing, Internet surfing and television viewing and get them physically active. The CDC said the campaign has resulted in a 34 percent increase in weekly free-time physical activity among more than 8 million children since its start in 2003.

"By picking their own VERB or several VERBs, tweens can identify the activities that fit their personalities and interests and use them as a launching pad to better their health," said Mike Greenwell, director of communications for the CDC's chronic disease center. "The VERB campaign lets tweens do their own thing -- or find a new thing -- and do it whenever and wherever they want."

That is what Showalter has tried to do with the VERB program at Thunderbolt Elementary. Showalter has taken some of the VERB program's activities, which she used in the fall with students at Lakeside Elementary, and continues to use the concept at Thunderbolt. She said she likes the program and the ideas it gives kids to stay active.

Showalter flipped through materials of the VERB program, including decks of cards that kids pick out that list an activity for them to do.

One card reads: "Bunny Hip Hop: Hip hop, get up. Grab some friends and bust a move."

Other cards are simpler and describe easier activities, such as kicking a soccer ball, stretching or dribbling a basketball.

The words "exercise" and "fitness" don't come out of 12-year-old Matt Smith's mouth when talking about what he was doing Thursday afternoon.

"It's fun. I hang out with all the other kids and stuff," he said. "I just hang out with my friends and play a lot of games."

Getting tweens attuned to a healthy lifestyle early is crucial, Showalter said.

"It's hard to start late in life being physically fit," she said. "Start them young. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

VERB Project Takes Action for Young Physical Fitness; Approach Adapts Exercise for Children, Youths According to Their Likes to Keep Them Active
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.