Law Schools Must Share the Blame

Manila Bulletin, April 4, 2004 | Go to article overview

Law Schools Must Share the Blame


FPJ said he had nothing to apologize to GMA-7 television reporter Sandra Aguinaldo, saying he had no intention to embarrass her. He just approached her from behind, thrust a microphone at her, and blurted out in Tagalog (why dont you speak instead! Why not? You seem to want to speak.). This happened during FPJs Iloilo campaign appearance on the stage, while Sandra tried to establish her presence close to the action and did the stand-upper. Ping Lacson reacted to that incident by sarcastically saying You can do standuppers with me anytime. It takes real humility to be able to make an apology. Humility is a strange disease to some, who giving an apology to others feels that his greatness will be diminished.

* * *

The terrorism committed by Muslims associated with Bin Laden and al-Qaeda abroad has given the innocent Muslims in this country a bad image. This perception has gradually implanted prejudice into the minds of people belonging to other religious groups, most especially the Christians who predominate in number as government employees. Oftentimes, this prejudice is translated into deeds. Whenever a government agent finds an opportunity to accost a Muslim on the prejudged belief that he is a terrorist because someone has said so or because the agent doesnt like how the Muslim looks, he immediately tags him as a terrorist and drags him for investigation.

* * *

The government should not brush off the denunciation of the Muslim leaders here for abducting their members as Abu Sayyaf suspects linked to the al-Qaeda terrorists. One of the two arrested, under duress, allegedly admitted participation in the recent bombing of the SuperFerry 14 in Manila Bay that killed 100 people. In Davao, three Muslims were accused of planning to terrorize Metro Manila, although they have been employed at the city hall for more than 15 years, one as a Madrassah Arabic teacher funded by the city, the other as a staff of the local civil registrar, and the third employed in the city mayors office. To show good faith, the government should engage lawyers to prosecute those who concocted the false information, if so. This is the least that the government can do.

* * *

It is public knowledge that the toughest government test to qualify a person to practice a profession in this country is the bar examination, which law graduates must take and pass before he can practice law. Mortalities in the bar examinations have always been big since this institution was established. The last bar exam in 2003 had the next highest number of examinees,the result of which was just published last Friday with 5,349 who had taken the test. To date, the greatest number of examinees was 5,453 in 1963. …

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