Celebrating Art and Music

By Uyar, Deborah S. | School Arts, November 1991 | Go to article overview

Celebrating Art and Music


Uyar, Deborah S., School Arts


As part of its centennial celebration, Carnegie Hall presented a unique educational outreach activity in collaboration with Learning Through Art, an independent, non-profit organization affiliated with the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum. An exciting twenty-two week, multi-disciplinary arts education initiative took place in seven schools located in Manhattan, Brooklyn, Queens and Staten Island.

For 100 years, Carnegie Hall has set a standard by which concert halls are judged. Eminent performers have premiered there as well as composers from many cultures. Early jazz debuted at the hall in 1912 with a ragtime concert in 1933; folk singing was featured. Important speakers at Carnegie Hall included Mark Twain, Booker T. Washington, Albert Einstein and Amelia Earhart.

Drawing on the rich heritage of Carnegie Hall, the students of P.S. 124 in Manhattan, with Learning Through Art artist-in-residence Marion Lange, employed various techniques to explore immigration and the culture of New York in one workshop. The students interviewed a person who immigrated to the United States. They invented headgear, costumes and accessories, made Styrofoam prints and painted portraits to piece together a more complete picture of that person.

Russia, music and Carnegie Hall have been connected since its gala opening one hundred years ago when Pyotr Tchaikovsky came to America to conduct several of his works. The sixth graders at P. S. 84 explored Russia's culture, music and art while studying Russia in their social studies classes. Each student selected a Russian republic to research, designed a visual image representing that state and painted the image on a constructed three-dimensional map of the U. …

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