Bush's Job Approval Low in Poll of Detroit Muslims

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), April 7, 2004 | Go to article overview

Bush's Job Approval Low in Poll of Detroit Muslims


Byline: Joyce Howard Price, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Sixty-one percent of Muslims active in mosques in Detroit, home to one of the largest Muslim populations in the United States, think "America is an immoral society," and about 85 percent disapprove of President Bush's job performance, according to a report released yesterday.

When asked whether "America is an immoral society," 26 percent of the mosque goers strongly agree and 35 somewhat agree. Most of the respondents understand "immorality" to mean high levels of sexual promiscuity and the moral climate within popular culture, the Institute for Social Policy and Understanding analysis says.

Only 16 percent of mosque leaders strongly agreed with the statement, with another 36 percent somewhat agreeing.

"They want to be involved in American society, yet at the same time, they are displeased with some aspects of American society," said the analysis entitled "A Portrait of Detroit Mosques: Muslim Views on Policy, Politics and Religion."

The report by the Michigan-based Muslim think tank said radicalism and isolationism are not evident in the Detroit mosques, with about 93 percent endorsing both community and political involvement.

More than 80 percent of the Muslims, 50 percent of whom came to the United States since 1990, said they believe Islamic law should play a greater role in Muslim countries, but the report cautioned that this response should not be interpreted as a desire by Muslims to impose Islamic law in America.

Describing the "overwhelming" level of disapproval of Mr. Bush, the lead author of the report said the study represents the views of a typical Muslim in America.

"The president has lost the Arab, South Asian and Muslim vote in America," said Ihsan Bagby, an ISPU fellow and associate professor of Islamic Studies at the University of Kentucky. …

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