Mirror Works: What's Hot .. and Not; PLANNING A CAREER CHANGE? CHECK OUT THE HIGH-FLYING JOBS OF THE FUTURE - AND THE ONES TO STEER CLEAR OF

The Mirror (London, England), April 15, 2004 | Go to article overview

Mirror Works: What's Hot .. and Not; PLANNING A CAREER CHANGE? CHECK OUT THE HIGH-FLYING JOBS OF THE FUTURE - AND THE ONES TO STEER CLEAR OF


Byline: SHEILA PROPHET

MOST of us dream about having a more glamorous career, although we don't go to the extremes of Leonardo DiCaprio in Catch Me If You Can.

In the film, Leo plays Frank Abagnale Jr who bluffs his way into high-profile jobs as an airline pilot and doctor.

But according to research by City & Guilds, the UK's leading provider of vocational qualifications, more of us could be fulfilling our dreams for real as the job market of the future is set to change. Demand in more glamorous professions will increase, they say, while vacancies in the more humdrum, traditional sectors will fall.

So, what are the top five careers they reckon will be crying out for high-fliers in the next five years?

AIRLINE PILOTS: Rising incomes and the ability to afford more holidays, as well as the growth of low-cost airlines, means the number of jobs in air travel will keep soaring, with an increase in the number of pilots, air crew and ground crew.

PLASTIC SURGEONS: A growing celebrity culture and a desire to remain forever young, plus an increase in people's disposable income, means more plastic surgeons will be needed.

TAX ADVISERS: OK, it sounds a bit dull, but it could be a lucrative career choice. The need for tax advice is growing for a number of reasons - the tax burden in the UK is rising, the system is becoming more complex, the number of top-rate taxpayers is growing and new tax-based incentives for entrepreneurs and small firms are being introduced.

COMPUTER SECURITY CONSULTANTS: The increasing dependence of all businesses on IT means that in the future even the smallest firms will need to ensure their systems are safe and secure. The glamour factor may not be high, but the salary could be.

GOLF PROFESSIONALS: The Tiger Woods Factor has made golf cool for kids and more women are taking up the game too. The increasing interest means a much higher demand for one-on-one lessons with a professional.

But the future isn't quite so rosy for some other sectors. City & Guilds predicts that the following five jobs will all but disappear by 2010.

POSTAL WORKERS: The increasing use of digital services will see their numbers decline.

ESTATE AGENTS: Their jobs will be overtaken by faster and cheaper online services.

CAR DEALERS: As buying a car online becomes easier, less showroom staff will be needed.

FARM WORKERS: The prospect of low incomes and future changes in EU agricultural policies means many will be forced to turn to other careers such as tourism.

TELEPHONE OPERATORS: Redundancies will rise as new developments in technology see people replaced with machines. …

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Mirror Works: What's Hot .. and Not; PLANNING A CAREER CHANGE? CHECK OUT THE HIGH-FLYING JOBS OF THE FUTURE - AND THE ONES TO STEER CLEAR OF
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