SARS Virus Returns to China as Scientists Race to Find Effective Vaccine

By Fleck, Fiona | Bulletin of the World Health Organization, February 2004 | Go to article overview

SARS Virus Returns to China as Scientists Race to Find Effective Vaccine


Fleck, Fiona, Bulletin of the World Health Organization


SARS returned to China's Guangdong Province last month prompting a mass cull of wild animals suspected of contributing to the spread of the disease. However it is unlikely that vaccines being developed by scientists in Canada, China, the United States and other countries will be ready for an outbreak in 2004.

Chinese authorities and WHO officials said on 5 January that a 32-year-old Chinese television producer had tested positive for the SARS virus that infected about 8098 people and killed 774 people in 26 countries last year. People who had been in close or normal contact with him have not developed symptoms. It was the first confirmed case of SARS since last summer, apart from two research scientists in China (Province of Taiwan) and Singapore who became infected while conducting laboratory experiments in September and December.

A 20-year-old waitress who fell ill on 25 December was put in an isolation ward with a suspected case of SARS on 31 December. The woman, a migrant worker from Henan Province, worked in a restaurant in Guangzou, the capital of Guangdong, the Chinese region where the virus is thought to have first surfaced in November 2002.

It was still unclear whether Chinese authorities have another "outbreak" on their hands or isolated cases. Under new WHO guidelines due to be issued in January, if one person infects another, this would constitute "an outbreak." However, no link has been established between the television producer and the waitress, according to WHO.

Scientists are investigating the TV producer and the waitress in the hope this will lead them to the source of the virus which could be in animals, humans or the environment. Following an investigation of the restaurant where the waitress worked, WHO said on 16 January that it had found strong evidence that civet cats--a gastronomic delicacy in China--are linked to the disease. The restaurant is believed to have served wild animal meat including civet.

"I think there is very good evidence to think animals are the reservoir and the way the disease gets started," said WHO researcher, Dr Robert Breiman. The television producer, however, told Chinese media after being discharged from hospital on 8 January that he had never eaten civet cat.

More than 100 people who had been in contact with the television producer and the waitress were placed under quarantine or observation, but have not shown any symptoms. …

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