A Day in a Balinese Village

Sunset, December 1991 | Go to article overview

A Day in a Balinese Village


MOST OF ALL, BALI IS temples, art, and the mystical relationship of the people to the land. And, while you'll find exotic temples and good art in cities and tourist centers, the best way to get a feeling for their cultural role is to spend a day or so in a village.

Ubud, about an hour's drive north of hotel districts in Kuta Beach and Sanur, is a good place to start. Since the 1930s, it has been a major center for Balinese painting and art. Plenty of good, inexpensive lodgings and restaurants are in or near town. While the town center has grown, the surrounding villages remain essentially unchanged by tourism.

Two easy walks can introduce you to the area. Stop first at the information office of Bina Wisata, on Jalan Raya, Ubud's main street. The office sells a Bali Path Finder map (the best area map we found) for about $2. It can also help you find lodging, make reservations for dance and gameplan performances, and provide information on temple festivals and weddings open to visitors.

Enough happens in the center of town to keep you busy for a good part of a day.

The Puri Lukasan Museum, also on Jalan Raya and open 8 to 4, offers a good introduction to Bali's distinctive art styles with works by some of the island's best artists.

A few doors east, the Lotus Cafe serves good Balinese and Western food at shady tables overlooking a lotus pond.

START DOWN MONKEY

FOREST ROAD

Walk a block farther east down Jalan Raya and you'll come to Monkey Forest Road on the right, with Ubud's main market at the corner.

Go early to sample the best produce and wander through small alleys lined with stalls. The market is also a good place to buy the wide cloth sash that must be worn when entering any temple or shrine. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

A Day in a Balinese Village
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.