How's Your Work Ethic? That's Good Way to Measure Success

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), April 30, 2004 | Go to article overview

How's Your Work Ethic? That's Good Way to Measure Success


Byline: Bob Frisk

It's easy to mistake activity for passion.

Anyone can take part in high school sports and feel that the participation is enough. You show up every day, do your thing and go home.

What more is there?

There's a lot more. It's how you do your thing that's crucial and separates you from so many others who just seem to be going through the motions.

That's where the passion comes in.

Without passion as a high school athlete, you will not be motivated to work hard to become successful.

Without passion, you'll be just another person on that field or in that gymnasium.

Frankly, if you didn't show me passion and I was the coach, I don't know if I would even want you on my team.

If I had ever coached at the high school level, I think my greatest satisfaction would have been teaching kids who had so much passion for the sport that they were willing to work hard to get better and couldn't wait to use every day with the team as a growing experience.

I would delight in coaching boys or girls who had the proper work ethic.

Yes, I know boys and girls in high school sports probably feel it's the coach's job to inspire them.

I also know it's a two-way street. I guarantee coaches put out their best effort when they are inspired by the work ethic of their athletes.

Games can be won at practice. I believe that. Athletes should work so hard at what the coach is saying that when they go into that next game they actually feel they deserve to win.

Work ethic is a term tossed around quite regularly in all these feature stories you read in our Sports Extra sections each Friday.

And with good reason.

The kids with passion get the special features. They deserve it. They have adopted a strong work ethic as one of their core values. They're the achievers, the winners on the field and in life even at that young age.

We develop our sense of character at a very young age, using adults in our lives as role models. If those role models fail us early in life, we may fail when it counts.

It's tough to develop a solid work ethic in high school if you didn't learn that lesson growing up. We care about the fundamentals with our youth athletic programs, but teaching a proper work ethic at that age also is vital.

Lessons learned early do last a lifetime. …

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