Defending Harbors: Coast Guard Requiring Ports to Tighten Security

By Kennedy, Harold | National Defense, May 2004 | Go to article overview

Defending Harbors: Coast Guard Requiring Ports to Tighten Security


Kennedy, Harold, National Defense


The U.S. Coast Guard has begun aggressive enforcement of the Maritime Transportation Act in an effort to increase protection of the nation's ports and waterways from terrorist attack, according to the service's vice commandant, Vice Adm. Thomas J. Barrett.

The act, passed by Congress in 2002, requires approximately 9,000 cargo and passenger vessels plying U.S. waters, and 3,200 port facilities, off-shore oil rigs and others in the maritime industry to develop and implement security plans. Ship and facility operators were supposed to turn in their plans by December 31. By early March, 97 percent had done so, Barrett told National Defense in an interview at Coast Guard headquarters in Washington, D.C.

The Coast Guard is "aggressively pursuing those who did not, and has begun issuing notices of violation with a $10,000 penalty," Barrett said. The identities of specific vessels and facilities that have received notices have been designated "sensitive security information" and will not be released to the public, Barrett said. Operators have until July 1 to implement the plans.

All vessels--except passengers carrying fewer than 150 people, towed drilling rigs and dredges--are required to have such schemes. So are all port facilities receiving vessels certified to carry more than 150 passengers, unless they are included in the master plan of a larger area.

The documents are supposed to address security measures for cargo, passengers, baggage, ship crews and dock workers. They are to include security drills and exercises, and designation of security personnel.

Commercial vessels operating in particularly confined and busy waterways will be required to install automatic identification systems to allow monitoring by Coast Guard and other federal, state and local agencies. The Coast Guard has requested $4 million in 2005 to continue installing AIS equipment in its Vessel Traffic Centers, which monitor shipping activity and provide navigational advice. The service currently has such centers in Valdez, Alaska; Seattle, Wash.; Houston, Texas; Morgan City, La.; Louisville, Ky.; Sault Ste Marie, Mich.; New York City, N.Y., and in California, San Francisco and Los Angeles. Another is being developed in New Orleans, where an offshore supply vessel cap-sized in February after colliding with a container ship, blocking the busy Southwest Pass of the Mississippi River.

Meanwhile, the Coast Guard has completed assessments of security at 11 ports and established 42 Area Maritime Security Committees to enhance local planning, communication and response. It also has met with officials from nearly 60 countries, representing the vast majority of companies that ship to the United States.

"Our message is clear," Barrett said. "By July 1, all foreign shipping coming into the United States must have improved security regimes in place."

Ships wishing to enter U.S. ports also must notify the Coast Guard at least 96 hours in advance, Barrett noted. In addition, vessels are required to provide detailed information about crews, passengers and cargoes.

"We will go on board vessels and make sure they comply with these requirements," Barrett said. The Coast Guard has been placing armed Sea Marshals on key vessels as they enter and leave ports since 9/11.

The service also has established Maritime Safety and Security Teams in eleven ports, including Seattle; Los Angeles; San Francisco; San Diego; New York; Chesapeake, Va.; Galveston, Texas; St. Mary's, Ga.; Boston, Mass.; Honolulu, Hawaii, and Anchorage, Alaska.

These teams of 100 active-duty and reserve Guardsmen are designed to deploy rapidly by air, ground or sea to counter threats anywhere in the United States. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Defending Harbors: Coast Guard Requiring Ports to Tighten Security
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.