BBC Man and the War Hero Uncle Who Died on a Mission to Find the Tirpitz; Norwegians Honour Spitfire Pilot Who Became a Symbol of Their Struggle against Nazis

The Mail on Sunday (London, England), May 9, 2004 | Go to article overview

BBC Man and the War Hero Uncle Who Died on a Mission to Find the Tirpitz; Norwegians Honour Spitfire Pilot Who Became a Symbol of Their Struggle against Nazis


Byline: MIKE MERRITT;MARK AITKEN

IT was a daredevil mission to gather vital information on one of the most feared ships in Hitler's navy.

Hiding deep in the Norwegian fjords, the mighty Tirpitz posed a constant threat to Allied convoys in the Arctic and supply routes to Russia.

The Allies desperately needed information on the position of the 41,000-ton battle ship to launch an attack on it - so Flying Officer Frederick Ian Malcolm did not hesitate to volunteer for a hazardous reconnaissance mission.

As the 26-year-old RAF pilot - great-uncle of BBC political editor Andrew Marr - prepared to take off in his Spitfire, he knew his chances of survival were slim.

Not only would he meet resistance from German forces, but he had barely enough fuel to take him there and back.

With the odds heavily against him, Flying Officer Malcolm pointed his Spitfire in the direction of the Tirpitz - but just three miles from his objective, on May 10, 1942, he was shot down and killed by a German Luftwaffe ace over Trondheim in Norway.

Now, 52 years later, his sacrifice is to be honoured by Norwegians at a special ceremony later this month.

It follows painstaking research into his life by a Norwegian war historian, and the creation of a memorial stone at the site where his plane crashed.

The service of dedication will be held at the memorial, which incorporates the propeller from his plane, on the Forbordfjell mountain near Trondheim.

Visiting the stone will be his 85-year-old sister Muriel and her children Malcolm, David, Evelyn, Freda, Linda and Sheila. Mr Marr has also been invited to attend.

Last night, Flying Officer Malcolm's niece Sheila Scott said her family had until recently been unaware of how highly the Norwegians regarded their relative's bravery.

Dr Scott said: 'Andrew knows the story and is rightly proud of his great-uncle.

'The family knew Uncle Freddie had been killed over Norway but we did not know the details of his fate, nor that he had become such a symbol for the local Norwegian population of British sacrifice to free their country from German occupation. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

BBC Man and the War Hero Uncle Who Died on a Mission to Find the Tirpitz; Norwegians Honour Spitfire Pilot Who Became a Symbol of Their Struggle against Nazis
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.