Going Green Saves over Time

By Spivey, Angela | Environmental Health Perspectives, April 2004 | Go to article overview

Going Green Saves over Time


Spivey, Angela, Environmental Health Perspectives


Making buildings that are easy on the environment doesn't have to be hard on the wallet, according to an October 2003 report commissioned by the Sustainable Building Task Force, which represents more than 40 California. government agencies. The Costs and Financial Benefits of Green Buildings concludes that a building that incorporates "green" features costs on average 2% more to build than a conventional one, but that over the 20-year life of a building, those features pay back the investment more than 10 times.

According to California's State and Consumer Services Agency, buildings and the water, power, and gas systems that fuel them account for more than 25% of the U.S. greenhouse gases produced each year and consume nearly 39% of the energy consumed in the United States each year. Total cost savings from green buildings come from lower costs for energy, waste disposal, water, operations, and maintenance, as well as savings from increased productivity and health among occupants.

The report authors--including representatives from the consulting firm Capital E, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and the California Department of General Services--reviewed existing data from more than 300 cost-benefit studies and analyzed the costs of 33 office and school buildings registered for certification under the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design Green Building Rating System, the largest and most widely recognized sustainable building design certification program in the United States. These buildings were chosen in part because the builders could provide not only information about the actual building costs but also estimates and models of what the same building would have cost to build conventionally. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Going Green Saves over Time
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.