Changes in Europe: By 2008 Some 8,500 1st Armd. Div. Soldiers and Family Members Will Be Relocated, Perhaps to Grafenwohr, the U.S. Army's Premier Training Site in Germany

By Hasenauer, Heike | Soldiers Magazine, April 2004 | Go to article overview

Changes in Europe: By 2008 Some 8,500 1st Armd. Div. Soldiers and Family Members Will Be Relocated, Perhaps to Grafenwohr, the U.S. Army's Premier Training Site in Germany


Hasenauer, Heike, Soldiers Magazine


IN Bad Nauheim, Germany--home to Elvis Presley from 1958 to 1960 while he was stationed at Ray Barracks in nearby Friedberg--local city mayors gave a party for the families of Soldiers of the 1st Armored Division who were deployed to Iraq.

"Realizing the difficulty that many families are experiencing with their Soldiers deployed, we wanted to do something as a show of solidarity," said Bad Nauheim's mayor, Bernd Rohde.

"I've been the mayor here since 1981, and it's always been a great pleasure for me to be a part of the close German-American community," he said.

Similar events to show the support of the German people for American Soldiers in Iraq have been held throughout Germany, in the communities where German-American friendships have flourished for more than a half-century, he said.

Individuals have also reached out on their own to show their support for Germany-based U.S. Soldiers. [See related story, "Sending CARE to Iraq."]

Evolution of Change

For decades, the U.S. military presence in Germany prevented communist aggression, allowed former adversaries to gain first-hand knowledge of each other's cultures and lifestyles, and opened doors to lifelong German-American friendships.

The collapse of communism created dramatic changes in Europe in the last decade and resulted in closure of U.S. military facilities across the continent.

According to Doug Sims, chief of the Documents, Equipment and Stationing Branch, Documents Division, G3, in Heidelberg, the Army had two corps, or four divisions, in Europe from the 1960s to 1989. Two divisions each in V Corps and VII Corps were complemented by forward elements of the 1st Infantry Division.

At the height of the Cold War, some 220,000 U.S. Soldiers were stationed in Europe; in Germany, Italy, Belgium, Netherlands and Luxembourg, Sims said. They lived and worked at more than 600 installations throughout Western Europe. Now, one-third the number of installations accommodates about 65,000 Soldiers, Sims said.

Additionally, the 65,000 local nationals and Department of the Army civilian employees, collectively, within USAREUR have dwindled to 17,000.

Continuing Transformation

The most recent round of base closures will affect communities across Germany between now and 2008. And some U.S. officials liken the scope of the impending changes to the widespread changes that altered the face of the continent when communism's "Iron Curtain" fell.

Since spring 2003 Marine Gen. James L. Jones, the commander of U.S. European Command, has been crafting a plan to transform U.S. forces in Europe, in keeping with the Army's plans to cut costs, improve training opportunities and locate military forces closer to future potential hot spots.

In May 2003 the Department of the Army announced that it would close about a dozen facilities in Giessen, home of the 1st Armored Division's 1 st Brigade and the 284th Base Support Battalion.

By 2008 some 8,500 1st Armd. Div. Soldiers and family members will be relocated, perhaps to Grafenwohr, the U.S. Army's premier training site in Germany. The Grafenwohr Training Area has already been identified as the future home of a brigade combat team, Army officials said. [See "Building Up Graf."]

Giessen's Military History

During World War II Giessen

Interacting with Soldiers deployed for Military Depot was home to German infantry troops. There was an aircraft maintenance hanger, and the German army used some of the buildings as detention cells for U.S. prisoners, said Petra Roberts, a spokeswoman for the 284th BSB, which encompasses U.S. military facilities in Friedberg, Bad Nauheim, Giessen, Butzbach and Kirchgoens.

U.S. Soldiers first arrived at the depot in March 1945.

After the war, "many German POWs were detained at the Giessen Depot. They were given the option to leave or sign a contract to work for the U. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Changes in Europe: By 2008 Some 8,500 1st Armd. Div. Soldiers and Family Members Will Be Relocated, Perhaps to Grafenwohr, the U.S. Army's Premier Training Site in Germany
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.