Political Relations between Cuba and Mexico Deteriorate

SourceMex Economic News & Analysis on Mexico, May 12, 2004 | Go to article overview

Political Relations between Cuba and Mexico Deteriorate


The political relationship between Mexico and Cuba has gone from bad to worse this year, following disputes over a human-rights vote at the UN and allegations that Cuban President Fidel Castro's government has interfered in Mexico's domestic affairs.

Tensions between the two countries have been growing gradually since President Vicente Fox took office in 2000. The first sign of trouble occurred when Fox took time from a state visit to Cuba in February 2002 to meet with opponents of the Castro government in Havana (See SourceMex, 2002-04-24).

This incident was followed by accusations that the Fox government, under pressure from the US government, limited Castro's presence at the UN development summit in Monterrey a few weeks later. In that incident, Castro released an audio tape of a conversation he had with Fox in which the Mexican president asked him to leave the summit early to avoid a conflict with the soon-to arrive US President George W. Bush (see SourceMex, 2002-04-24).

The controversy over the Monterrey situation came just after Mexico's decision in 2002 to support a UN resolution condemning Cuba's crackdown on dissidents.

The Mexico-Cuba tensions faded into the background for some months with the resignation of foreign relations secretary Jorge Castaneda, who had been widely blamed for playing a major role in what were perceived as the Fox's government's anti-Cuba policies (see SourceMex, 2003-01-15).

Human-rights vote at UN ignites animosities

Mexico's policies toward Cuba, however, changed little under Luis Ernesto Derbez, Castaneda's replacement as head of the Secretaria de Relaciones Exteriores (SRE). Under Derbez's watch, Mexico again voted to condemn Cuba's human-rights record in a vote taken by the UN Human Rights Commission on April 15, 2004. Mexico and six other Latin American members of the UN Human Rights Commission--Chile, Costa Rica, Honduras, the Dominican Republic, Guatemala, and Peru--voted to condemn Cuba's human rights record, while Argentina, Brazil, and Paraguay abstained.

A presidential spokesperson defended Mexico's vote, saying the Fox government's policy promotes "moderation" rather than "total condemnation" and is not anti-Cuban but rather pro-human rights.

The resolution to condemn Cuba in the UN was introduced by Honduras under pressure from the US, Cuban officials said. The Castro government, testing Honduras' commitment to human rights, later asked the Central American country to petition the UN High Commissioner on Human Rights to appoint a relator to monitor the condition of the US base in Guantanamo, where more than 600 prisoners from the Middle East, Afghanistan and other areas are being held (see NotiCen, 2004-05-06).

Before the vote, speculation was rampant that Mexico would abstain in exchange for a speedy return of fugitive businessman Carlos Ahumada, who had fled to the island nation after he was caught offering bribes to Mexico City legislative leader Rene Bejarano. All along, Mexican and Cuban officials insisted that the UN vote and the request to extradite Ahumada were totally unrelated. "There is no relationship between Mexico's vote at the UN and the extradition request for Mr. Ahumada," Derbez told reporters on April 14.

While Mexico would not reveal its position as late as the day before the UN vote, White House spokesperson Scott McClellan indirectly revealed that Mexico had already decided to condemn Cuba. In a press conference, McClellan said Presidents Fox and Bush had spoken by telephone and concurred on the need to approve the resolution condemning Fidel Castro's regime.

But the Fox administration's failure to dispute McClellan's comment was the strongest confirmation that it would vote against Cuba. Critics were even more concerned that the news came from the US, which they said was evidence that the Bush administration had strongly influenced Mexico's decision. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Political Relations between Cuba and Mexico Deteriorate
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.