Selected Law Journals for Further Reading

By Saunders, Robert S., Jr. | National Forum, Fall 1991 | Go to article overview

Selected Law Journals for Further Reading


Saunders, Robert S., Jr., National Forum


As the law profession has increasingly specialized, the number of law journals has multiplied. Each field within the profession has at least one publication. With the profusion of legal periodicals, it is difficult for one not trained in the legal profession to keep up with legal events.

Legal periodicals and journals can be divided into five distinct categories: law-school reviews (e.g., Harvard Law Review), specialized law journals (e.g., Business Lawyer), bar-association journals (e.g., ABA Journal), interdisciplinary-law journals (e.g., Journal of Legal Studies), and foreign-law journals. Using suggestion from several of the authors contributing to this issue, we have compiled the following list of journals to assist our readers who desire to further pursue topics discussed in National Forum. Of course, these are only suggestions, and this list should not be considered definitive.

ABA Journal, The Lawyer's Magazine. Gary A. Hengstler, editor an publisher. American Bar Association Press, 750 North Lakeshore Drive, Chicago, Illinois 60611. The ABA Journal began publication in 1915 as a topical and feature magazine. Although its audience is primarily lawyers, the journal is written so that it can be understood by lay persons. Most of the articles concentrate on current legal issues, but there are other features as well. It usually includes color illustrations, a lawyer life-style feature, and amusing stories sent in by practicing attorneys. Frequency: quarterly. Circulation: 422,000. Subscription rate: $66 annually.

Business Lawyer. David E. Nelson, editor. American Bar Association Press, 750 North Lakeshore Drive, Chicago, Illinois 60611. This journal is used primarily by corporate attorneys to keep abreast of the rapidly changing business world. Each issue contains ten or more articles covering the effects of national events on the business community. The journal also included a section on recent literature detailing corporate, banking, and business law. Frequency: quarterly. Circulation: 50,000. Subscription rate: $27 annually.

Columbia Law Review. Daniel P. Penn, editor. Columbia Law Review Association, Inc. Columbia University School of Law, 435 West 116th Street, New York, New York 10027. Published more than ninety years, this journal covers a wide range of legal topics. Most of the articles are written by eminent law professors, and student editors contribute notes. Recent topics include bankruptcy reorganization, habeas corpus petitions, and corporate governance and control. Especially useful are the book review by eminent law professors. Frequency: eight issues per academic year. Circulation: 3,000. Subscription rates: $36 domestic; $42 foreign; $8.50 single issue.

Ethics: An International Journal of Social, Political, and Legal Philosophy. Gerald Dworkin, editor. University of Chicago Press, Journals Division, Post Office Box 37005, Chicago Illinois 60637. Founded in 1890, Ethics concentrates on issues in social, political, and legal philosophy. It is valuable to both lawyers and lay persons who wish to explore many ethical questions and dilemmas. Especially useful are the "survey articles," which present a valuable overview of vital issues. Frequency: quarterly. Circulation: 3,500. Subscription rates: $49 (institutions), $26.50 (individuals), $19 (students).

Harvard Law Review. J.T. Bethell, editor. Harvard Law Review Association, Gannett House, Cambridge Massachusetts 02138. From one of the most prestigious law schools in the nation, the Harvard Law Review covers all aspects of the American judicial system. A typical issue includes articles, book reviews, essays on legal history, and interesting debates written by law professionals. Law students contribute comments and notes. Harvard Law School also publishes several specialized journals dealing with the legal profession. Frequency: monthly (except July and August). Circulation: 10,000. Subscription rate: $36. …

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Selected Law Journals for Further Reading
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