The War on Sovereignty: When the New World Order Architects at the Council on Foreign Relations Prattle about Sovereignty, They Mean Something Entirely Different from Independent Nation-States

By Jasper, William F. | The New American, May 17, 2004 | Go to article overview

The War on Sovereignty: When the New World Order Architects at the Council on Foreign Relations Prattle about Sovereignty, They Mean Something Entirely Different from Independent Nation-States


Jasper, William F., The New American


I will merely repeat that we are at present working, discreetly but with all our might, to wrest this mysterious political force called sovereignty out of the clutches of the local national states of our world. And all the time we are denying with our lips what we are doing with our hands....

--Arnold J. Toynbee Historian, Royal Institute of International Affairs, 1931

"The people of our country are united behind our men and women in uniform, and this government will do all that is necessary to assure the success of their historic mission." So declared President George W. Bush in his April 13 press conference on Iraq. "One central commitment of that mission," the president continued, "is the transfer of sovereignty back to the Iraqi people. We have set a deadline of June 30th. It is important that we meet that deadline."

Sovereignty. The president invoked the term 12 times in his press conference, three times in one sentence: "Once we transfer sovereignty, we'll enter into a security agreement with the government to which we pass sovereignty, the entity to which we pass sovereignty." It should be of more than passing interest that sovereignty-talk is once again in vogue, at least where Iraq is concerned. Not only the president, but other politicians, legal experts, academicians and journalists have weighed in on the urgent necessity of transferring sovereignty from the occupational forces to the Iraqis. But it is nothing more than deceptive lip service.

For most of the past century, national sovereignty has been in retreat, steadily eroded by a profession of treaties and international organizations. All the while, it has been anathematized and scorned by the intelligentsia and the one-world lobby as a stumbling block to world order and world peace.

So why is it suddenly not just acceptable but apparently obligatory for even dedicated globalists to get worked up over Iraq's "sovereignty"? The inveterate internationalists at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace and the Council on Foreign Relations have been producing task force reports, press conferences, articles and op-ed columns on the subject for months. French Foreign Minister Dominique de Villepin, in a radio interview last August, pressed the U.S. to speed up the transfer, asserting that "a logic of occupation must be rapidly replaced by a logic of sovereignty." French President Jacques Chirac delivered the same message last September in a New York Times interview: "There will be no concrete solution unless sovereignty is transferred to Iraq as quickly as possible."

This double talk is from two of the most militant Eurocrats who have been pushing relentlessly for years to destroy the national sovereignty not only of France but of all the countries of the European Union and to subject all to the growing EU central government based in Brussels. Why the concern over sovereignty for Iraq, but not for France, Italy, Germany, and the other (former) nation states of Europe?

Verbicide and Sovereignty

When internationalists speak positively of national sovereignty, they mean something entirely different from the commonly understood, traditional meaning of the term. In short, they are committing verbicide--that is, deliberately butchering the true definition of the word. In the case of Iraq, for instance, they speak of a "transfer of sovereignty" that entails continued military occupation for years to come and administration of many of the functions of the nation-state by the United Nations. Recall that in his demand for "sovereignty" for Iraq, Monsieur Chirac also demanded a "key role" for the UN. The supposedly anti-UN Bush administration agrees. "Nobody wants the U.N. in there more than we do," an unnamed "senior State Department official" told the Washington Post. "We're going to do everything we can to get them there," the official was quoted as saying in the Post's February 18 story. …

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