A Monumental Piece of History; Celebration and Sadness on the Mall

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), May 27, 2004 | Go to article overview

A Monumental Piece of History; Celebration and Sadness on the Mall


Byline: Suzanne Fields, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

It was a perfect Washington evening, warm with just a hint of the summer to come, with a tiny crescent of a moon climbing into the eastern sky to replace the sun sinking behind a grove of elms.

The Washington Monument pointing toward the clouds reminded the men, women and children out for a stroll that in America, troubled though we are in the midst of a war that many are reluctant to acknowledge as war, the sky is still the only limit to the nation's aspirations. Across the Mall the Lincoln Memorial loomed with elegant gravitas, testifying that the government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the Earth. The breeze seemed to echo the promise of Martin Luther King Jr., who once stood on those steps to speak of his dream.

Now these two great national landmarks are linked in vision and sanctity by a new memorial, to be dedicated this Memorial Day weekend to the men and women of a generation, now swiftly fading into history, who saved civilization over four years of war six decades ago. The pillars and pavilions, shooting fountains and waterfalls, granite blocks and bronze reliefs envelop a public space that invites reflection and action, stillness and a rush of excitement. Silent stones stand in solemn counterpoint to the geysers of water that seem to shoot for the stars. Sculpted ropes of bronze connect an arc of pillars attesting to the strength of national unity.

We were engulfed in the buzz of children's voices delighting in an outing at the end of a day, punctuating the lowered voices of elderly men exchanging memories of a time now long ago, in places far away where they couldn't be sure they would ever see home again. An elderly black man stood before the word "Remagen," carved in stone, and a tear trickled down a leathered cheek as he spoke softly of comrades who died at a bridge too far in March 1945. Nearby a Guatemalan family of four, in their new country for only five years, spoke of their joy of living in the United States. Teenagers from Ohio, on their senior trip to the nation's capital, pointed to a flock of birds flying overhead and remarked that they could be a squadron of warplanes.

This no ordinary memorial was 17 years in the making, overcoming the objections of preservationists determined that not a single blade of grass would be disturbed on the Mall, of "Enfantistas" who would brook no changes in the original plan of the Mall by Pierre L'Enfant, of the minimalists who object to its monumental celebration of the veterans of World War II. …

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