Down and out in Texas

By Pollitt, Katha | The Nation, May 10, 2004 | Go to article overview

Down and out in Texas


Pollitt, Katha, The Nation


Did you know that since January 1, women in Texas have not been able to obtain abortions from the sixteenth week of pregnancy on? This blackout on women's rights and health is happening not because abortions after the fourth month were declared illegal--far from it: In theory, all that has changed is a bureaucratic regulation included in a bundle of antiabortion legislation, HB15. Most of the provisions in HB15, which sailed through the Republican-dominated state legislature, are familiar: There's a twenty-four-hour waiting period and a requirement that clinics offer a flower-decorated pamphlet called A Woman's Right to Know, which suggests a link between abortion and breast cancer, stresses the possibility of psychological damage and gives the death rate for abortions performed at various stages of pregnancy. The bill also requires providers to photocopy patients' IDs and keep them on file.

The killer provision, though, is the one that has received the least press coverage: Beginning with the sixteenth week of pregnancy, abortions can no longer take place in clinics--they must now be performed in a hospital or an ambulatory surgical center. The catch is, Texas hospitals, many of which are Catholic, do almost no abortions, and of the state's 273 surgicenters not one performs the procedure or plans to take it on. For a clinic to qualify as a surgical center it would have to meet hundreds of architectural specifications at a cost of well over a million dollars. "There's nothing about these abortions that requires these regulations," says Sarah Wheat, director of public affairs at TARAL, the state's NARAL affiliate. "They were presented as necessary for women's health, but women's health organizations opposed them."

What happens when the only facilities that can legally provide abortions after sixteen weeks won't, and the only facilities that want to provide them are legally barred from doing so? Thousands of Texas girls and women suffer. The law is written so tightly--no exceptions even to save the woman's life--that clinics have no wiggle room, says Amy Hagstrom Miller, who owns the Whole Woman's Health Clinic in Austin and another in McAllen, near the Mexican border. In fact, many clinics have stopped doing abortions after fourteen weeks just to be on the safe side. Miller has been referring three or four women a week to clinics in Louisiana, Arkansas and Kansas. (Paradoxically, HB15 has meant plenty of work for Wichita's Dr. George Tiller, whom anti-choicers consider the Antichrist.) "Anyone I refer is at least eight hours away from an out-of-state clinic. It's a real burden on them. The majority don't make the trip--it's too expensive." Even if the two clinics now considering an upgrade manage to pull it off, the state is so huge that most women will be left in the cold.

The vast majority of women who terminate their pregnancies do so quickly: 88 percent of abortions are performed before the twelfth week; 96 percent before the sixteenth week. Most who wait that long are young, poor or both: teens in denial about what's happening to their bodies, women trapped in abusive situations, rural women without transportation, women who spend the first trimester chasing the money to pay for the procedure even as delay drives up the price. …

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