War and Tropical Forests: Conservation in Areas of Armed Conflict

By Raven, Peter H. | Environmental Health Perspectives, May 2004 | Go to article overview

War and Tropical Forests: Conservation in Areas of Armed Conflict


Raven, Peter H., Environmental Health Perspectives


War and Tropical Forests: Conservation in Areas of Armed Conflict

Edited by Steven V. Price New York: Food Products Press (Haworth Press), 2003. 219 pp. ISBN: 1-56022-098-8, $49.95 cloth; ISBN: 1-56022-099-6, $24.95 paper

This well-organized collection of essays represents the first systematic effort to determine the impact of war and civil strife on tropical forest conservation. Tropical forests are vastly important for the conservation of biodiversity in general, because they may be home to more than half the world's species. Moreover, these species are the most poorly known anywhere; even disregarding bacteria and other prokaryotic organisms and using the most conservative estimates, their associated plants, animals, fungi, and microorganisms consist of 4-5 million species, with no more than 1 in 10 even having been given a scientific name.

Although we all wish it were otherwise, civil strife and war have characterized our overcrowded world, with its unsustainable dreams of increased human consumption and prosperity. Almost all tropical forests occur in the less-developed nations, and they are being exploited ruthlessly by the citizens of these countries and especially by the seemingly insatiable desire for their valuable resources in the richer nations.

The need to conserve these forests and their biota continues both in war and in peace. Once they are gone, we have no way, ever, to get them back. So what strategies should be adopted by those who are devoted to conserving them? Building bridges is necessary in both war and peace, and as Annette Lanjouw brings out so well, there is much room for collaboration among relief, conservation, and development organizations which have methods, goals, and objectives in common. Jeff McNeeley, drawing on his vast experience in tropical conservation, emphasizes not only that armed conflict can often rapidly exhaust resources used by the combatants, but that peace---often accompanied by the nationalization of resources and the disenfranchisement of indigenous people--can be even worse. Bushmeat poaching may be especially intense during armed conflict, and such animal populations may have no opportunity to recover. Often, relatively pristine natural areas are offered to the combatants once peace is attained, and intense exploitation often follows. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

War and Tropical Forests: Conservation in Areas of Armed Conflict
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.