Blair and Co Helped to Create the Hysteria over Asylum-Seekers. Now They Insist the Only Way to Beat the BNP Is to Vote Labour. What a Cheek!

By Thomas, Mark | New Statesman (1996), May 10, 2004 | Go to article overview

Blair and Co Helped to Create the Hysteria over Asylum-Seekers. Now They Insist the Only Way to Beat the BNP Is to Vote Labour. What a Cheek!


Thomas, Mark, New Statesman (1996)


The far right in Britain, in its present guise as the British National Party, likes to promote the idea of "racial purity". Yet, if you ever meet party members, the words "racial purity" are not what come to mind. What comes to mind is the word "inbreeding". The BNP candidates look as if there isn't one of them who couldn't do with a decent dollop of Kosovar asylum-seeker's blood just to widen the gene pool. And surely it must count as a bit of an own goal to hate foreigners and then stand in the European elections. No one seems to have pointed out to them that Europe is, shock horror, foreign. So if the unthinkable happens and they do get a seat in the European Parliament, they will have to go abroad and hang out with a load of foreigners, which should piss them off no end.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

The BNP tries to cloak its racism in respectability, claiming that it is not anti-black, merely pro-white, which is about as believable as Adolf Hitler claiming that he was not anti-Semitic, merely pro-foreskin.

Not surprisingly, the BNP is not really interested in local-authority politics. Having got 17 seats last time around, it is worth looking at how it has fared since. Out of the 17 councillors, according to the anti-fascist magazine Searchlight, Luke Smith resigned from Burnley Council after attacking a man with a bottle; Maureen Stowe left the party claiming the BNP "did not care for Burnley at all"; Robin Evans, a Blackburn councillor, left too, amid claims that drug dealers and football hooligans were in his branch; and John Savage, BNP councillor in Sandwell, was so bewildered by council debates and voting that he ended up supporting a pro-asylum-seeker motion. That surely has to be a first--a BNP councillor so stupid that he couldn't even be a proper racist. Many BNP councillors have not attended council meetings and those who have, rarely--if ever--speak there.

BNP councillors have done nothing but sit on their arses, claim their expenses and mutter occasional rubbish. There is not one ex-member of the House of Lords who was as lazy and arrogant as that. Surely this can't have gone unnoticed. So if the BNP does get returned or increases its vote, it could underline the message that many anti-racist activists have been getting in places such as Burnley and Blackburn--that voting BNP is done out of anger with Labour.

And why shouldn't they hate Blair and his chums? Much of the Labour Party membership does, a sizeable chunk of the cabinet does, and even Tony's wife has given him some funny looks of late. …

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Blair and Co Helped to Create the Hysteria over Asylum-Seekers. Now They Insist the Only Way to Beat the BNP Is to Vote Labour. What a Cheek!
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