Legal Matters: Region Leads Way in Fight against Thugs; the Crown Prosecution Service Has Introduced a Specialist Prosecutor to Spearhead West Midlands' Fight against Anti-Social Behaviour. Home Affairs Correspondent Richard Warburton Talked to John Davies about His New Role

The Birmingham Post (England), June 2, 2004 | Go to article overview

Legal Matters: Region Leads Way in Fight against Thugs; the Crown Prosecution Service Has Introduced a Specialist Prosecutor to Spearhead West Midlands' Fight against Anti-Social Behaviour. Home Affairs Correspondent Richard Warburton Talked to John Davies about His New Role


Byline: John Davies

Anti-social behaviour has become the scourge of the early 21st century.

An increase in vandalism, prostitution, vehicle and criminal damage, drug misuse, harassment and racial abuse are all worrying signs of the times.

Many anti-social crimes plague neighbourhoods the length and breadth of the country, causing misery to thousands of people.

To combat the rise in this blight on the community the Government introduced new laws six years ago which included the introduction of the anti-social behaviour orders -Asbos -that have already had an effect in clamping down on nuisance crime.

Now the Home Office has taken a further step. It has introduced specialist prosecutors with responsibility for pursuing cases through the courts, applying for Asbos and acting as a central contact point for local agencies dealing with the problem -such as the police and local councils.

John Davies, the man in charge of Birmingham Trials Unit at the West Midland Crown Prosecution Service, is the lawyer charged with what Home Secretary David Blunkett describes as: 'Matching the courage and dedication of victims and witnesses with a firm resolve to ensure offenders receive the punishment they deserve'.

To many that may appear a daunting prospect, but not to John Davies. The 46-year-old has set up a system that has the West Midlands CPS leading the country in dealing with antisocial behaviour.

Brutally honest, remarkably laid back and an engaging raconteur, Mr Davies has set out his stall for a pro-active response to anti-social behaviour.

'The anti-social laws and Asbos are all about empowering the general people and the bottom line is that they benefit the victims, just as the legal system should,' he said.

'Asbos work best when all agencies dealing with anti-social behaviour join together to tackle the problem and that is what I want to achieve and that's what we are working towards. …

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Legal Matters: Region Leads Way in Fight against Thugs; the Crown Prosecution Service Has Introduced a Specialist Prosecutor to Spearhead West Midlands' Fight against Anti-Social Behaviour. Home Affairs Correspondent Richard Warburton Talked to John Davies about His New Role
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