New Newspaper in the Netherlands: International Group of College Students Producing an English-Language Paper in the City of Masstricht

By Solomon, Harvey | Editor & Publisher, December 21, 1991 | Go to article overview

New Newspaper in the Netherlands: International Group of College Students Producing an English-Language Paper in the City of Masstricht


Solomon, Harvey, Editor & Publisher


New newspaper in the Netherlands

The dean of the European Institute for Internal Communication (EIIC), a branch of Emerson College that opened this fall in Masstricht, the Netherlands, offered his print journalism students a choice - produce a standard college paper focusing on campus life or a community newspaper that addresses the larger concerns of the growing English-speaking population of this southernmost Dutch city of 125,000.

"The students were very scared because they were all new to town and didn't know anything about sources or even how to move about," said Dean Manny Paraschos, a University of Missouri Ph.D. and veteran of the North Little Rock (Ark.) Times, the Fayette (Mo.) Democrat-Leader and the Columbia Missourian. Twenty-four hours later he had his answer, and the free paper's title, Global Voice, reflected his students' decision. Its inaugural run of 2,000 eight-page copies quickly disappeared from local primary and secondary schools, hotels, shops and Maastricht's information bureau and train station. By the third issue it had expanded to 3,000 copies of a 12-page paper, including three pages of advertising.

"By introducing a brand-new newspaper into the media landscape of Maastricht," he said, "the EIIC is filling a much-needed niche within the community and helping to return something to our host city. We're using multilingual students, some of whom do not have English as their first language, so you can see some interesting translations of thought from other languages.

"Nevertheless, it is truly an international effort and the students not only write and edit the newspaper but compose it and sell the advertising. We have a German and a Greek selling the advertising, a Yugoslav as the head photographer, a news editor from Spain, and staff writers from all over the globe."

Located within an hour's drive of Belgium and Germany, Maastricht became the focus of world attention on Dec. 9 and 10 with the convening of the European Community Summit. Hundreds of print and broadcast journalists from around the globe descended upon this thriving city of 125,000 people to cover meetings and deliberations among delegations from the 12 European member-nations regarding potential political and economic unions.

Global Voice devoted considerable space in its inaugural issue to the complex preparations for the summit, as well as to key economic and social issues facing a reconstructed Europe.

"When the boundaries disappear, that doesn't mean at that moment on Jan. 1, 1993 [that all] traffic will be liberated, for instance economic traffic, political traffic," Ben Wilms, adviser to the mayor of Maastricht told the paper. …

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