American Forests & Corporate Responsibility

By Gangloff, Deborah; Olson, Jeff | American Forests, Spring 2004 | Go to article overview

American Forests & Corporate Responsibility


Gangloff, Deborah, Olson, Jeff, American Forests


Corporations and environmental groups have shared a love/hate relationship for decades. At AMERICAN FORESTS we have a different perspective on business. When the organization first got off the ground in the 19th century, founders invited representatives of various industries to serve on the board of directors. It still raises eye-brows in some sectors when we acknowledge, for instance, the involvement of the forest and railroad industries in AMERICAN FORESTS' history.

The idea is simple, and it's one we hold dear: Forest conservation cannot move forward without representatives of the industries that use those resources sitting at the table. This is a tenet we still adhere to and one that largely sets AMERICAN FORESTS apart from other environmental groups.

Over the nearly 130 years of our existence, AMERICAN FORESTS' forest conservation advocacy has benefited from the concerns and involvement of other industries too. Our board members have included George Wall Merck, Henry Ford, Anson Goodyear, Samuel Gompers, and Maurice Goddard.

Honorary vice presidents have included Walt Disney, Laurence Rockefeller, Edsel Ford, and Mrs. Henry Ford, along with Lady Bird Johnson, Aldo Leopold, Lowell Thomas, and Frederick Law Olmsted. Our members have included such well-known names as P.S. du Pont, George Eastman, Thomas A. Edison, John Pierpont Morgan, Richard B. Mellon, and Marshall Field 3rd.

Fast forward to the present. When we launched the action and education campaign Global ReLeaf in 1988, we recognized that businesses and corporations have a role in environmental improvement--just like individuals, community groups, governments, and nonprofit organizations.

Corporations have money, it's true, and AMERICAN FORESTS promises our corporate supporters we will use their money to improve forests in an environmentally proper way. But business is much more than just deep pockets. We ask three things from each of our corporate sponsors.

First, of course, we ask for financial support, which underwrites tree planting for forest restoration or supports our longstanding role to interpret science and research for public policy use. Second, corporations represent people--employees, clients, customers, suppliers--and we ask that they put this "people power" to use by planting trees, spreading the word about the need for improved forest conservation, and urging people to join AMERICAN FORESTS as supporting members or donors. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

American Forests & Corporate Responsibility
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.