Perspective: Kitchen Sink Drama Won't Wash in Court; Does TV Chef Gordon Ramsay's Management Style Work in Practice? and Is It Legal? Steve Miller Asks Two Birmingham Experts

The Birmingham Post (England), June 8, 2004 | Go to article overview

Perspective: Kitchen Sink Drama Won't Wash in Court; Does TV Chef Gordon Ramsay's Management Style Work in Practice? and Is It Legal? Steve Miller Asks Two Birmingham Experts


Byline: Steve Miller

Gordon Ramsay's style of management has been the subject of much debate during Hell's Kitchen. But, behind all the shouting and swearing employment law experts at Eversheds ask whether he really is the boss from hell or if he should be seen as a role model for the modern manager.

Emma Harris, employment law expert at Eversheds in Birmingham, said: 'Some of Gordon Ramsay's management style is legally pretty risky -there would certainly be issues in most workplaces if a manager used his bullying tactics to get the most out of people. Swearing at staff and reducing them to tears would definitely put him on the wrong side of employment law.

'However, his management style is not all bad. He has a very clear and direct approach which is certainly honest and open. His 'employees' in Hell's Kitchen always knew what they had done wrong and how he wanted them to rectify a situation -something that many managers shy away from, leaving employees in the dark about areas of weakness.'

This programme has highlighted the importance of communication in the workplace for both employers and their staff. It is often a failure to communicate that leads to employment tribunals.

For example, judging from what we have seen on TV, no employee of Ramsay is going to be able to claim that his dismissal was unfair because he didn't know that his performance was below standard.

However, employers should ensure there is a policy which ensures that employees get a fair hearing and can appeal against any warning.

Emma Harris concludes: 'The other area in which Gordon Ramsay scores highly is in the praise he gives people when they do well. While he is never shy to criticise, he is generous in rewarding success and this has proved to be very motivating for his current celebrity 'employees'.'

'While Gordon Ramsay's extreme style of management may not be appropriate in most workplaces, there are elements to learn from. He has a highly motivated workforce -something that many managers struggle to achieve.'

Richard Powell, an employment barrister at law firm DLA in Birmingham, said: 'If you can't stand the heat, get out of the kitchen is an acceptable reference to temperature, but if it is symptomatic of the language and aggression shown to a junior employee, then it isn't.

'It is in some ways incredible to note how Mr Ramsay has brought several people from complete ineptitude as chefs to a standard which is acceptable to his demanding customers in such a short time, and his methods must therefore seem quite attractive to many who line manage the new or inexperienced. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Perspective: Kitchen Sink Drama Won't Wash in Court; Does TV Chef Gordon Ramsay's Management Style Work in Practice? and Is It Legal? Steve Miller Asks Two Birmingham Experts
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.