Edward Whymper (1840-1911): Mountaineer, Writer and Artist, Best Known for Making the First Successful Ascent of the Matterhorn, Improving the Aneroid Barometer and Studying Altitude Sickness

By Amodeo, Christian | Geographical, June 2004 | Go to article overview

Edward Whymper (1840-1911): Mountaineer, Writer and Artist, Best Known for Making the First Successful Ascent of the Matterhorn, Improving the Aneroid Barometer and Studying Altitude Sickness


Amodeo, Christian, Geographical


What was his background?

Edward Whymper was born in London in April 1840. The son of an artist, he was privately educated before going on to train as a wood engraver. He became interested in mountaineering in 1860 having been commissioned to sketch the central and western Alps and duly packed himself off to Switzerland. The following year, he climbed Mount Pelvoux. Subsequent mountaineering endeavours included the first ascent of the Pointe de Ecrins, in 1864, at that time the highest peak in the French Alps before Mont Blanc became a French possession. Whymper climbed throughout the Alps during the early 1860s and managed many first ascents.

Why is he famous?

He is best known for making the first successful ascent of the Matterhorn, in 1865. Although the peak had been deemed unclimbable by local experts, Whymper and his rivals weren't deterred from making repeated attempts to climb it during the early 1860s. Initially, they approached via the southwestern, or Italian, ridge and Whymper made six failed attempts. His breakthrough came when he started from Zermatt, Switzerland, in the east. From the ground, the route looked impossible, but Whymper decided it was just an illusion and went ahead anyway. To his delight, he was proved right and, with six others, reached the summit on 14 July 1865. However, disaster struck on the way down when four of his party fell to their deaths. Whymper and the remaining two were only saved because the rope tying the group together broke before they could be dragged after the others. In Zermatt, there was some controversy as to whether the rope had been cut in order to save the remaining three. This accusation was later refuted by an official inquest. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Edward Whymper (1840-1911): Mountaineer, Writer and Artist, Best Known for Making the First Successful Ascent of the Matterhorn, Improving the Aneroid Barometer and Studying Altitude Sickness
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.