Conlon's Cincinnati Experience to Benefit Ravinia

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), June 4, 2004 | Go to article overview

Conlon's Cincinnati Experience to Benefit Ravinia


Byline: Bill Gowen

It's been a year since James Conlon was named music director designate of the Ravinia Festival; the "designate" is due to disappear from his title in 2005.

But Conlon will have plenty to do this summer during Ravinia's 100th anniversary season, when his several concerts with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra are interwoven with an equally busy schedule by Christoph Eschenbach, who wrapped up his music directorship last summer in order to move more fully into his job as the new music director of the Philadelphia Orchestra.

Conlon, whose debut as a guest conductor at Ravinia dates back to 1977 (at the invitation of executive director Edward Gordon and music director James Levine) has been a regular visitor to Ravinia, appearing annually from 1977-90 and several times during the past decade as his time as general music director of Cologne (Germany) and principal conductor of the Paris National Opera allowed.

Conlon will be a driving force in Ravinia's "One Score, One Chicago" educational initiative, having selected Antonin Dvorak's "New World" Symphony as the work to be explored during this summer's second year of that project.

Last weekend, I made what has become an annual visit to the Cincinnati May Festival, the oldest choral festival in North America, where Conlon just celebrated his 25th anniversary as music director.

And judging from the performance I experienced of Gustav Mahler's Eighth Symphony (the "Symphony of a Thousand") last Saturday night, we have quite a lot to look forward to in the years ahead as Maestro Conlon, in collaboration with President and CEO Welz Kauffman, shapes the future of Ravinia.

To state that Conlon conducted a "knockout" performance of the mammoth Mahler work is an understatement. With eight vocal soloists, along with orchestral and choral forces numbering more than 400, this was a Mahler Eighth to treasure. There was splendid playing by the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra, the May Festival Chorus (prepared by Robert Porco), along with the choruses of the Cincinnati College Conservatiory of Music, the Cincinnati Boychoir and Cincinnati Children's Choir (the latter two groups stationed in the lower balcony of historic Cincinnati Music Hall).

This is one of those pieces that require special attention by the conductor because of its complex and large-scale nature. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Conlon's Cincinnati Experience to Benefit Ravinia
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.