North Boy Soldier Shooting Revealed

Evening Chronicle (Newcastle, England), June 14, 2004 | Go to article overview

North Boy Soldier Shooting Revealed


Byline: By Jamie Diffley

A harrowing TV documentary programme on boy soldiers who fought in WW1 will feature a North East teenager shot for leaving his post.

Pte Herbert Burden was the first soldier to be shot by his own army when he was executed in July 1915.

Tonight Britain's Boy Soldiers ( part of Channel Four's Secret History series ( reveals details of the 17-year-old's life and the fight to pardon him and the 305 other soldiers shot for military offences.

At least 250,000 under-age boys fought for Britain during the 1914-1918 conflict.

They lied about their age so they could sign up to fight for their country. Some were as young as 14.

Around 120,000 were killed or wounded - many by their own side.

Newcastle veteran John Hipkin who set up the Shot At Dawn campaign to grant pardons has already seen the programme on a preview tape.

He said: "It was a ridiculous situation and none of these soldiers should have been shot.

"It really angers me that the government has still not granted pardons. But our fight continues and we have great support all across the country."

Pte Burden was just 16 when he joined the Northumberland Fusiliers and fought on the Western Front.

He was executed in July 1915 after a military hearing. The uneducated 17-year-old was not represented in the hearing.

An 8ft statue of the soldier was unveiled in 2001 at the National Memorial Arboretum near Lichfield, Staffordshire. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

North Boy Soldier Shooting Revealed
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.