'Poland Knows Very Well'

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), June 14, 2004 | Go to article overview

'Poland Knows Very Well'


Byline: James Morrison, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

'Poland knows very well'

Poland has no regrets about joining the U.S.-led coalition that removed Saddam Hussein, and it plans to stay in Iraq as long as necessary, according to the Polish ambassador.

"Polish troops joined the coalition against Saddam Hussein because he was a brutal and ruthless dictator who defied international orders and threatened the security of the region," Ambassador Przemyslaw Grudzinski told a Heritage Foundation forum attended by our correspondent Stephanie Dornschneider.

"As a result of our history, Poland knows very well that dictators must be confronted and not appeased."

Poland, which lost two soldiers in combat last week, has 2,400 troops in Iraq who are likely to stay even if the command shifts from the United States to the United Nations. The ambassador said most Polish troops deployed abroad serve in U.N. peacekeeping operations.

Mr. Grudzinski said Polish-American relations are "deeply rooted" and "grounded firmly in the mutually shared values of freedom and democracy" and "have only become stronger."

However, the ambassador urged the Bush administration to include Poles in a program that exempts them from visas for short stays in the United States.

"It would be proper to include Poland into the visa-waiver program," he said.

Mr. Grudzinski also called for more U.S. investment in Poland. The United States, which has made $8.5 billion in private investment during the past 14 years, has slipped from being the biggest foreign investor in Poland to the third-largest.

Diplomatic traffic

Foreign visitors in Washington this week include:

Today

* Afghan President Hamid Karzai, who meets Secretary of State Colin L. Powell, Defense Secretary Donald H. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

'Poland Knows Very Well'
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.