The Fogelman Executive Center

Business Perspectives, Fall 1991 | Go to article overview

The Fogelman Executive Center


Participants from as far away as Hong Kong, Canada, and Puerto Rico attend seminars at the Fogelman Executive Center, Memphis State's residential conference center. Big and small businesses look to the center for seminars, conferences, symposiums, and meetings.

Local, regional, and national companies seek out supervisory seminars, training in communication, cultural diversity, finance and accounting at this four-story complex. For example, CPAs and tax attorneys look to the Center for the latest information on both federal and state tax issues, while nursing educators from across the country and Canada come here every year to update their training skills.

The Center contains 13 meeting rooms--including a 400-seat auditorium and a computer training room with 16 IBM-compatible computers. Permanent walls prevent noise bleedover between rooms. In addition to meeting rooms, the Center's third floor features a 116-person capacity restaurant, while the fourth floor offers 51 executive hotel rooms and 3 suites for overnight guests.

A number of Mid-South companies such as Federal Express, Peat Marwick Main, and Malone and Hyde look to the Fogelman's staff to provide meeting planning, strategic planning sessions, and major product or service introductions. These and other companies can also take advantage of the Center's satellite downlink for broadcasting teleconference activities.

The faculty of the Fogelman College of Business and Economics present many of the seminars. For example, Dr. Pat Schul teaches the nationally-recognized seminar "Negotiate to Win." Professors Craig Langstraat, John Malloy, and Bob Sweeney, all of whom are CPAs, teach seminars on taxes and finance.

The Center's staff also provides customized training programs for business. Last year, Collins and Aitkman sent its Kinney Floor Coverings sales staff through a specially-designed course in professional sales training led by Dr. Schul; Dr. Tom Ingram, holder of the only chair of excellence in marketing in the country; and Dr. …

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