Media Coverage

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), June 16, 2004 | Go to article overview

Media Coverage


Byline: Greg Pierce, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Media coverage

Sen. John Kerry "had the best press of any nominee we've ever tracked - 81 percent positive," the nonpartisan Center for Media and Public Affairs said in announcing a content analysis of network evening newscasts in January and February.

The organization also found that "Democratic primary candidates have gotten 60 percent good press since 1988, compared to 45 percent for Republicans."

"The numbers, from the group founded and headed by Dr. S. Robert Lichter, were featured in the March/April issue of the group's newsletter, Media Monitor, an issue just mailed at the end of last week," another news watchdog group, the Media Research Center (www.mediaresearch.org), said yesterday.

As of yesterday, the Center for Media and Public Affairs had yet to post the results on its Web site (www.cmpa.com).

Meanwhile, the latest report from Media Tenor (www.mediatenor.com), an independent media analysis institute, found that "since April, the networks have practically abandoned coverage of President Bush's economic policy - even as the economy and labor market have shown signs of significant improvement."

Patriot games

Teresa Heinz Kerry says she quit the Republican Party because it questioned the "patriotism" of Vietnam triple amputee Max Cleland, a U.S. senator from Georgia who was defeated in 2002.

Mrs. Kerry's charge went unquestioned in an Associated Press dispatch.

"The GOP had raised questions about Cleland's patriotism because of his position on legislation to create the Department of Homeland Security," the AP said. "Cleland supported the concept behind the department, but insisted that a workers' rights provision be part of the bill."

What the wire service failed to point out was that President Bush had vowed to veto the bill creating the department unless he had the same authority as previous presidents to shift national-security employees as judged necessary. Senate Democrats, at the urging of their labor-union allies, refused to budge. Thus, it became an issue in the Georgia contest.

Mrs. Kerry, in an interview scheduled to be broadcast last night on "CBS Evening News," said: "Three limbs, and all I could think was, 'What does the Republican Party need, a fourth limb to make a person a hero?' And this coming from people who have not served. I was really offended by that. Unscrupulous and disgusting," she said, apparently referring to Mr. Bush and Vice President Dick Cheney.

Patriot games II

Singer Jon Bon Jovi says his support for the presidential candidacy of Democratic Sen. John Kerry has led hecklers to question his patriotism.

"I've received hate mail at my house. I've had people drive by my home and shout things out," Mr. Bon Jovi told guests gathered outside his New Jersey mansion Monday for an event that raised more than $1 million for Mr. Kerry. "And I think that they question my patriotism because I decided to stand up and have a voice. And I stood up to have a voice because I think that's the most American thing that you can do."

More than 300 people attended the fund-raiser, including actors Meg Ryan and James Gandolfini and Steve Buscemi, both of HBO's "The Sopranos," and Richard Belzer of NBC's "Law and Order: Special Victims Unit," the Associated Press reports.

Catholic action

The Massachusetts Catholic Conference is sending letters to all 710 parishes in the state urging Catholics to "share their profound disappointment" with state legislators who did not vote to ban homosexual "marriage" earlier this year, the Boston Globe reports. …

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