Dubliners Celebrate James Joyce 100 Years after He Wrote 'Ulysses'

Manila Bulletin, June 16, 2004 | Go to article overview

Dubliners Celebrate James Joyce 100 Years after He Wrote 'Ulysses'


Byline: SHAWN POGATCHNIK

DUBLIN, Ireland (AP) Dubliners are celebrating the centenary of Bloomsday and are showing their appetite for James Joyce and his masterwork, Ulysses. But most agree that its a taste more challenging than the novels stomach-churning kidney breakfast.

Tens of thousands from Ireland and around the world are taking part in weeks of events climaxing Wednesday with the 100th anniversary of June 16, 1904, the fictional setting for Leopold Bloom and Stephen Dedalus epic odyssey through inner-city Dublin.

Joyces use of myriad literary styles, Homeric allusions and revolutionary stream of consciousness combined to make "Ulysses" one of the most highly praised but inaccessible of books.

For the first time this year, annual celebrations of "Bloomsday" have mobilized thousands of ordinary Dubliners to celebrate a literary achievement that few fully appreciate.

More than 10,000 locals at a Sunday outdoor breakfast on the capitals major thoroughfare, OConnell Street, dined on fried kidneys in honor of the meal Bloom himself cooked up featuring "grilled mutton kidneys" with "a fine tang of faintly scented urine."

"Its time, finally, for Dubliners to take back ownership of Joyce," said Helen Monaghan, a grandniece of the Nobel-winning author, who acknowledges she has found her granduncles writings "hard work" and require much study.

Published originally in Paris in 1922, "Ulysses" was banned in Britain and the United States until the mid-1930s because of its vulgarity, mocking of religion and vivid descriptions of intestinal functions, masturbation, adultery and Dublins red-light district.

It wasnt freely available in Ireland until the 1960s, two decades after Joyces death in 1941.

Monaghan, 33, recalls how her relatives long downplayed their connections to Joyce, who emigrated from Dublin in October 1904.

After a brief visit home in 1912, he spent the rest of his life in self-imposed exile in Trieste, Italy, Paris and Zurich, Switzerland.

"Being related to that Joyce was a major issue in my fathers time. My grandmother, May Joyce, always said the family should not deny the relationship we just shouldnt boast about it," said Monaghan, who is administrator of the James Joyce Center, a central Dublin town house that opened 17 years ago to promote appreciation of the writers life and works.

The first "Bloomsday" celebrations in Dublin werent observed until June 16, 1954, when a handful of writers and poets piled into two horsedrawn carriages to sample several pubs connected to Blooms fictional odyssey.

Fifty years later, "Bloomsday" now attracts literary tourists from all over the world.

The challenge has been to broaden Joyces appeal beyond the Joycean elite, who don Edwardian bowlers and bonnets only to be mocked by snide Dublin onlookers as "the prats in hats."

The Joyce center is mounting its own traditional Bloomsday breakfast Wednesday, featuring readings from the book. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Dubliners Celebrate James Joyce 100 Years after He Wrote 'Ulysses'
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.