IBM Veteran Stephen Carns Finds a Slot at Systematics

By Barthel, Matt | American Banker, December 31, 1991 | Go to article overview

IBM Veteran Stephen Carns Finds a Slot at Systematics


Barthel, Matt, American Banker


The resume of Systematics president Stephen A. Carns looks more like a train schedule.

During the first 10 years of the technology executive's career, he held jobs in Chicago, Denver, Minneapolis, Cincinnati, Portland, and New York - most of them for International Business Machines Corp.

His itinerant ways have slowed in recent years. Now, Mr. Carns is settling down in Little Rock, Ark., where he was named president and chief operating officer at Systematics Information Services Inc., effective Wednesday.

"The whistle-stopping is done, I think," said Mr. Carns in a recent interview. "And the way this business is changing, I doubt if I'll feel like things are passing me by."

Toward an Extended Presence

As the No. 2 man at Systematics, under chief executive John E. Steuri, Mr. Carns will oversee software development and facilities management services for financial institutions.

Specifically, Mr. Carns hopes to bolster Systematics' already strong presence in an increasingly competitive business: handling bank's data processing operations, often referred to as outsourcing.

By most accounts, Systematics ranks a strong second in the outsourcing market behind perennial leader EDS Corp. of Dallas, a General Motors Corp. subsidiary. However, a number of companies have stepped up their efforts to land large bank contracts in recent months, and industry watchers say Systematics is feeling the squeeze.

"Systematics has been perceived - perhaps incorrectly - as a company for small and medium-size banks," said M. …

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