Teacher Communication across the Preschool-School Boundary

By Hopps, Kathryn | Australian Journal of Early Childhood, March 2004 | Go to article overview

Teacher Communication across the Preschool-School Boundary


Hopps, Kathryn, Australian Journal of Early Childhood


Introduction

Transition to school is a topical issue in the early childhood field (Dunn & Simpson, 2000). In recent years, with the growing awareness of the importance of early school experiences, transition practices have assumed greater importance in both schools and centre-based children's services. Easing the transition to school for young children is the responsibility of the whole community, including families and educators in schools and prior-to-school settings (New South Wales Department of School Education, 1997; Dockett & Perry, 2001). Communication between these parties is fundamental to successful transitions.

In New South Wales many children attend children's services prior to the commencement of formal schooling, the first year of which is known as 'kindergarten'. Among these services are 'preschools' which are state government funded, non-compulsory care and education programs for children generally between the ages of three and five years. In this paper 'preschool' is a broad term which includes the traditional preschool service as well as other settings which children attend in the years before starting school, such as long day care centres.

Research to date suggests that schools do not build upon what children have learned in preschool (Kagan & Neuman, 1998), and that exchanges of information between preschool and school teachers are often absent (Baillargeon, Betsalel-Presser, Joncas & Larouche, 1993; Pianta, Cox, Taylor & Early, 1999). Other studies have revealed differences in kindergarten and preschool teachers' expectations of children's behaviour (Higgins-Hains, Fowler, Schwartz, Kottwitz & Rosenkotter, 1989; Hadley, Wilcox & Rice, 1994) and that school and preschool teachers have different views about skills children need for school (Davies & North, 1990).

The New South Wales Curriculum Framework for Children's Services (Stonehouse, 2002) supports the practice of staff in children's services and schools sharing information about their programs and expectations, and with parental consent, their knowledge of individual children. The New South Wales Department of Education and Training (1999) also promotes two-way communication between school and preschool or child care setting. However, anecdotal evidence from studies conducted in New South Wales suggests that preschool-school communication is not happening frequently or effectively (Dockets, personal communication).

Methodology

Two New South Wales Department of Education and Training primary schools and their main 'feeder' prior-to-school children's service were involved in the case study. A feeder setting is defined as a preschool or child care centre which many of the school's kindergarten children attend in the years before entry to school.

One of the cases involved a public school and its feeder preschool in a rural village; the other case centred on a public school and one of its feeder preschools in a regional city. To access teachers' beliefs and attitudes towards the practice of preschool-school communication, qualitative data was gathered by interviews, questionnaires and document collection. Interviews were conducted with five teachers involved in the study and questionnaires were completed by the remaining four participants. Documents such as parent information pamphlets and policies which pertained to transition to school and communications across settings were requested from each of the sites. Analysis of the data was completed by the coding of themes that emerged from the participants' responses and documents.

Participants

Nine participants were involved across the two cases in this study. In the rural village, the director and an assistant from the 26-place community-based preschool, as well as the principal and two kindergarten teachers from the local public school, were involved. Participants from the two sites in the regional city included the deputy principal and a kindergarten teacher from the public school. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Teacher Communication across the Preschool-School Boundary
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.