Homosexual Complications

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), June 24, 2004 | Go to article overview

Homosexual Complications


Byline: THE WASHINGTON TIMES

James V. Dolson ("Baseless claims," Letters, Monday) objects to Thomas Sowell's remarks about homosexuality. He asks for evidence that atrocities against homosexual persons are trumpeted by the press. Is he unaware of the Matthew Shepard incident in the 1990s, which received massive press coverage?

He asks for evidence that the press ignores homosexual violence against children. A few years after the Shepard killing, a young lad (whose name I do not recall) in a Southern state was raped by two men and asphyxiated by a gag stuffed in his mouth to shut him up. The press made almost no mention of the matter and did not treat it as a "hate crime."

As for statistical information on the homosexual life span, read "Homosexuality and the Politics of Truth" by Dr. Jeffrey Satinover or "Homosexuality: Good & Right in the Eyes of God?" (p. 244) by myself, or visit the International Journal of Epidemiology and search for "Modelling the impact of HIV disease on mortality in gay and bisexual men."

Concerning Mr. Dolson's reference to "diseases, or costs to taxpayers for dealing with their diseases," the enormous political clout of the homosexual lobby has won the protection of AIDS, a behavior-caused (and thus preventable) disease. It receives more government funding than diseases that cause far more deaths.

The homosexual agenda is aimed at protecting homosexual behavior. Mr. Dolson needs to explain to the public the specific sexual behaviors engaged in by homosexual persons, their health consequences, and why he thinks those behaviors should be protected by law.

Several of those deadly behaviors are being taught in Massachusetts public schools and are coming to your school soon if the homosexual agenda succeeds - the total sexualization of culture from cradle to grave.

God says "no" to homosexual behavior because the behavior is lethal. The loving of persons requires condemnation of self-destructive behavior.

EARLE FOX

Alexandria

*

Thomas Sowell needs no defense, but Mr. …

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